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TITLE
Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart looking north east
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P013
PLACENAME
Loch Ness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31430
KEYWORDS
lochs
castles
Castle Urquhart
Loch Ness
Alan Durward
Alexander II
Edward I
Comyns
Lords of the Isles
Jacobites
Covenanters
Historic Scotland
Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart looking north east

Loch Ness lies south west of Inverness and is the most northerly and largest of the three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles (37 km) long, 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and has an average depth of 600 feet (183 metres). This makes it the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain. It forms part of the Caledonian Canal, which runs from Inverness to Fort William, linking Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy.

Castle Urquhart sits on a headland near Drumnadrochit at the eastern end of Glen Urquhart and has extensive views up and down Loch Ness. Although evidence has been found of a Pictish fort situated on this site, earliest written records of the existence of a castle here date from the 13th century. Some of the castle's ruins originate from a fortification held by Alan Durward around 1230, when Alexander II wanted to defend the area after crushing a revolt in Moray.

The castle passed from the Durwards to the Comyns and later came under the control of Edward I, who enlarged the building and increased the fortifications. The castle was attacked by the MacDonald Lords of the Isles, changed hands many times and was occupied by Covenanters and Jacobites, before being blown up to prevent it becoming a Jacobite stronghold in 1691. Between 1912 and 1922, the castle was excavated and repaired. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart looking north east

INVERNESS: Urquhart and Glenmoriston

1830s

lochs; castles; Castle Urquhart; Loch Ness; Alan Durward; Alexander II; Edward I; Comyns; Lords of the Isles; Jacobites; Covenanters; Historic Scotland

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Loch Ness lies south west of Inverness and is the most northerly and largest of the three lochs in the Great Glen. It is 23 miles (37 km) long, 1 mile (1.6 km) wide and has an average depth of 600 feet (183 metres). This makes it the largest body of fresh water in Great Britain. It forms part of the Caledonian Canal, which runs from Inverness to Fort William, linking Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy.<br /> <br /> Castle Urquhart sits on a headland near Drumnadrochit at the eastern end of Glen Urquhart and has extensive views up and down Loch Ness. Although evidence has been found of a Pictish fort situated on this site, earliest written records of the existence of a castle here date from the 13th century. Some of the castle's ruins originate from a fortification held by Alan Durward around 1230, when Alexander II wanted to defend the area after crushing a revolt in Moray. <br /> <br /> The castle passed from the Durwards to the Comyns and later came under the control of Edward I, who enlarged the building and increased the fortifications. The castle was attacked by the MacDonald Lords of the Isles, changed hands many times and was occupied by Covenanters and Jacobites, before being blown up to prevent it becoming a Jacobite stronghold in 1691. Between 1912 and 1922, the castle was excavated and repaired. It is now in the care of Historic Scotland.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.