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TITLE
Loch Maree and Slioch Mountain from near the resting tree looking north
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P016
PLACENAME
Loch Maree
DISTRICT
Gairloch
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Gairloch
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31433
KEYWORDS
lochs
mountains
trees
folklore
islands
Isle Maree
saints
St Maelrhuba
Slioch
Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve
nature reserves
Loch Maree and Slioch Mountain from near the resting tree looking north

This illustration shows a view of Loch Maree with the mountain Slioch behind. The view is seen from the resting tree, an old pine tree which appears to grow out of the bare rock. This tree was on the south side of the loch, on the road from Kinlochewe to Poolewe. According to tradition, the ancient chiefs of Gairloch had more than one place of residence. When they moved from one to another, they were accompanied ,to the resting tree by vassals on the lands they were leaving where they were met by vassals from the lands to which they were travelling. Both parties sat down under the resting tree to refresh themselves before setting off again on their separate ways.

Loch Maree is a fresh water loch extending about 12 miles from Kinlochewe in the direction of Poolewe. The loch contains a number of islands, one of which, Isle Maree, has the remains of a chapel said to have been established by St Maelrubha in the 7th century. The loch is bounded on the north by the mountain Slioch which rises to 3215 feet (980 metres) and to the south by ancient Caledonian pine forest which makes up part of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve.

In the early 17th century the shores of Loch Maree were densely wooded and supplied material to power the largest iron-works in the Highlands. The site of these, on the north side of the loch, still bears the name Furnace.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Maree and Slioch Mountain from near the resting tree looking north

ROSS: Gairloch

1830s

lochs; mountains; trees; folklore; islands; Isle Maree; saints; St Maelrhuba; Slioch; Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve; nature reserves

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration shows a view of Loch Maree with the mountain Slioch behind. The view is seen from the resting tree, an old pine tree which appears to grow out of the bare rock. This tree was on the south side of the loch, on the road from Kinlochewe to Poolewe. According to tradition, the ancient chiefs of Gairloch had more than one place of residence. When they moved from one to another, they were accompanied ,to the resting tree by vassals on the lands they were leaving where they were met by vassals from the lands to which they were travelling. Both parties sat down under the resting tree to refresh themselves before setting off again on their separate ways.<br /> <br /> Loch Maree is a fresh water loch extending about 12 miles from Kinlochewe in the direction of Poolewe. The loch contains a number of islands, one of which, Isle Maree, has the remains of a chapel said to have been established by St Maelrubha in the 7th century. The loch is bounded on the north by the mountain Slioch which rises to 3215 feet (980 metres) and to the south by ancient Caledonian pine forest which makes up part of the Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve. <br /> <br /> In the early 17th century the shores of Loch Maree were densely wooded and supplied material to power the largest iron-works in the Highlands. The site of these, on the north side of the loch, still bears the name Furnace.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.