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TITLE
Loch Assynt and Ardvraick Castle
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P019
PLACENAME
Loch Assynt
DISTRICT
Assynt
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Assynt
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31434
KEYWORDS
lochs
castles
hills
mountains
Marquis of Montrose
Battle of Carbisdale
Calda House
Loch Assynt and Ardvraick Castle

This illustration shows a view of Loch Assynt, with Ardvreck Castle, as it is now known, in the middle distance. The loch extends for six miles in the heart of the Sutherland mountains. The hill behind the castle is Spidean Coinich (2507 feet, 764 metres), part of the Quinag massif, which rises to 2650 feet (808 metres) at Sail Gharbh.

The ruined Ardvreck Castle still stands, three storeys high, on a small peninsula on the north side of the loch, near Inchnadamph. It is believed to have been built in the late 1500s by the Macleods who had gained control of the area of Assynt in the 13th century. In 1650, James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, sought refuge in the castle after his defeat at the Battle of Carbisdale but the laird of Assynt refused him protection. Montrose was imprisoned in Ardvreck Castle before being taken to Edinburgh, where he was subsequently executed.

The castle was later acquired by the MacKenzies who built another mansion house, Calda House, nearby. Both Calda House and Ardvreck Castle were destroyed by fire in the 18th century.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Assynt and Ardvraick Castle

SUTHERLAND: Assynt

1830s

lochs; castles; hills; mountains; Marquis of Montrose; Battle of Carbisdale; Calda House

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration shows a view of Loch Assynt, with Ardvreck Castle, as it is now known, in the middle distance. The loch extends for six miles in the heart of the Sutherland mountains. The hill behind the castle is Spidean Coinich (2507 feet, 764 metres), part of the Quinag massif, which rises to 2650 feet (808 metres) at Sail Gharbh.<br /> <br /> The ruined Ardvreck Castle still stands, three storeys high, on a small peninsula on the north side of the loch, near Inchnadamph. It is believed to have been built in the late 1500s by the Macleods who had gained control of the area of Assynt in the 13th century. In 1650, James Graham, Marquis of Montrose, sought refuge in the castle after his defeat at the Battle of Carbisdale but the laird of Assynt refused him protection. Montrose was imprisoned in Ardvreck Castle before being taken to Edinburgh, where he was subsequently executed. <br /> <br /> The castle was later acquired by the MacKenzies who built another mansion house, Calda House, nearby. Both Calda House and Ardvreck Castle were destroyed by fire in the 18th century.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.