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TITLE
Loch Naver
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1103_P020
PLACENAME
Loch Naver
DISTRICT
Tongue and Farr
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Farr
PERIOD
1830s
CREATOR
John Fleming
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31435
KEYWORDS
lochs
rivers
hills
mountains
Highland Clearances
clearances
Loch Naver

This illustration shows a view of Loch Naver from Creag-a-gharrow on the northern side of the loch. On the opposite side is Ben Klibreck (from the Gaelic Beinn Cleith Bric, meaning 'hill of the speckled cliff') which rises to a height of 3154 feet (961 metres). Immediately below it is what looks like a small fort. The Klibreck Burn flows north into Loch Naver, which stretches eastward from Altnaharra. It is 6 miles (10 km) long and no more than half a mile wide at its broadest. It forms part of Strathnaver, which was heavily populated until the Clearances of the early 19th century.

This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.

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Loch Naver

SUTHERLAND: Farr

1830s

lochs; rivers; hills; mountains; Highland Clearances; clearances

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This illustration shows a view of Loch Naver from Creag-a-gharrow on the northern side of the loch. On the opposite side is Ben Klibreck (from the Gaelic Beinn Cleith Bric, meaning 'hill of the speckled cliff') which rises to a height of 3154 feet (961 metres). Immediately below it is what looks like a small fort. The Klibreck Burn flows north into Loch Naver, which stretches eastward from Altnaharra. It is 6 miles (10 km) long and no more than half a mile wide at its broadest. It forms part of Strathnaver, which was heavily populated until the Clearances of the early 19th century.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Lakes of Scotland' by John Fleming.