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TITLE
Dun Troddan, Glenelg
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_1438_P001A
PLACENAME
Glenelg
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Glenelg
DATE OF IMAGE
1831
PERIOD
1830s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31438
KEYWORDS
brochs
Glenelg
barracks
galleries
archaeology
Dun Troddan, Glenelg

Dun Troddan is one of three brochs (large stone towers) that lie along Gleann Beag in Glenelg. The broch is incomplete and it is thought that stone from it was used in the construction of Bernera Barracks.

The barracks were built in 1723 by the government following the 1715 Jacobite Rising.

The broch may date back to 100BC. It has two walls, a double shell, which makes it stronger than a single wall. There are galleries within the broch with steps leading from one to the next.

The broch was excavated in 1920 and a hearth and a ring of post holes were discovered. The post holes probably held supports for an upper gallery or a roof.

This illustration is taken from 'The Scottish Gael or Celtic Manners' by James Logan

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Dun Troddan, Glenelg

INVERNESS: Glenelg

1830s

brochs; Glenelg; barracks; galleries; archaeology

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Dun Troddan is one of three brochs (large stone towers) that lie along Gleann Beag in Glenelg. The broch is incomplete and it is thought that stone from it was used in the construction of Bernera Barracks. <br /> <br /> The barracks were built in 1723 by the government following the 1715 Jacobite Rising.<br /> <br /> The broch may date back to 100BC. It has two walls, a double shell, which makes it stronger than a single wall. There are galleries within the broch with steps leading from one to the next.<br /> <br /> The broch was excavated in 1920 and a hearth and a ring of post holes were discovered. The post holes probably held supports for an upper gallery or a roof.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Scottish Gael or Celtic Manners' by James Logan