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TITLE
Monument to the Stuart Kings
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2126_P001a
PLACENAME
St Peter's Basilica
DISTRICT
Vatican City
PERIOD
1810s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31465
KEYWORDS
monuments
graves
inscriptions
Jacobites
Scottish Crown
Stuarts
Charles Edward Stuart
churches
Monument to the Stuart Kings

This monument was erected in memory of the last Stuart kings. The inscription in Latin reads: Iacobi III, Iacobi II Magnae Brit Regis Filio, Karolo Advardo, et Henrico Decano Patrvm Cardinalivm, Iacobi III Filiis, Regiae Stirpis Stvardi Postremis, Anno M DCCC XIX. This means 'To James III, son of James II, King of Great Britain, to Charles Edward, and to Henry, Dean of the Cardinal Fathers, sons of James III, the last of the Royal House of Stuart, 1819.

James VII of Scotland (who was James II of England) was deposed and exiled in 1689 because of his despotic behaviour and his conversion to Roman Catholicism. He had, however, many supporters. They were known as 'Jacobites', a name derived from 'Jacobus', the Latin form of 'James'. His son, represented on the monument as 'James III', was known as the Old Pretender, 'pretender' meaning 'a claimant', as he claimed to be the rightful king. He in turn had a son, Charles Edward Stuart 'the Young Pretender', who is represented on this monument as 'Charles III', and is also known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie'. Charles' younger brother was Henry, Cardinal York.


In 1810, Monsignor Angelo Cesarini commissioned Antonio Canova to design a monument to King Henry. Work was delayed until the full price was paid in 1815. The design was changed to include James and Charles.

This monument is one of the few in St Peter's Basilica, in the Vatican City, which is not raised in memory of a Pope. Most of the non-papal monuments are in the crypt. This one is of white marble and has two mourning angels of death standing on either side of a tomb entrance. Above the door there are relief portraits of James III & VIII, Henry IX & I, and Charles III.


The illustration is from 'Glimpses of Church and Social Life in the Highlands in Olden Times', by Alexander MacPherson

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Monument to the Stuart Kings

1810s

monuments; graves; inscriptions; Jacobites; Scottish Crown; Stuarts; Charles Edward Stuart; churches

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (photographs)

This monument was erected in memory of the last Stuart kings. The inscription in Latin reads: Iacobi III, Iacobi II Magnae Brit Regis Filio, Karolo Advardo, et Henrico Decano Patrvm Cardinalivm, Iacobi III Filiis, Regiae Stirpis Stvardi Postremis, Anno M DCCC XIX. This means 'To James III, son of James II, King of Great Britain, to Charles Edward, and to Henry, Dean of the Cardinal Fathers, sons of James III, the last of the Royal House of Stuart, 1819.<br /> <br /> James VII of Scotland (who was James II of England) was deposed and exiled in 1689 because of his despotic behaviour and his conversion to Roman Catholicism. He had, however, many supporters. They were known as 'Jacobites', a name derived from 'Jacobus', the Latin form of 'James'. His son, represented on the monument as 'James III', was known as the Old Pretender, 'pretender' meaning 'a claimant', as he claimed to be the rightful king. He in turn had a son, Charles Edward Stuart 'the Young Pretender', who is represented on this monument as 'Charles III', and is also known as 'Bonnie Prince Charlie'. Charles' younger brother was Henry, Cardinal York.<br /> <br /> <br /> In 1810, Monsignor Angelo Cesarini commissioned Antonio Canova to design a monument to King Henry. Work was delayed until the full price was paid in 1815. The design was changed to include James and Charles.<br /> <br /> This monument is one of the few in St Peter's Basilica, in the Vatican City, which is not raised in memory of a Pope. Most of the non-papal monuments are in the crypt. This one is of white marble and has two mourning angels of death standing on either side of a tomb entrance. Above the door there are relief portraits of James III & VIII, Henry IX & I, and Charles III. <br /> <br /> <br /> The illustration is from 'Glimpses of Church and Social Life in the Highlands in Olden Times', by Alexander MacPherson