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TITLE
Outline map of Knapdale, Gigha, etc in Argyllshire
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2408_P003
PLACENAME
Knapdale and Gigha
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL
DATE OF IMAGE
1875
PERIOD
1870s
CREATOR
T P White
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31479
KEYWORDS
maps
areas
islands
fields
hills
Argyll
zoomable

Knapdale is an area lying to the north of the Kintyre peninsula and south of the Crinan Canal. It includes Loch Sween, Loch Caolisport and the Knapdale Forrest. The name is derived from the Gaelic 'cnap' meaning a small hill, and 'dail', a field.

The island of Gigha is separated from the mainland by the Sound of Gigha. It is a small island, only 6 miles (10km) from north to south, with an area of 3447 acres. It was granted to the Lords of the Isles in the 14th century and given to the MacNeills in the 1490s. The island has changed hands many times, including a community buy out in 2002 by the people living there.

This illustration is from 'Archaeological Sketches in Scotland: Knapdale and Gigha', by Captain TP White (1875)

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Outline map of Knapdale, Gigha, etc in Argyllshire

ARGYLL

1870s

maps; areas; islands; fields; hills; Argyll; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

Knapdale is an area lying to the north of the Kintyre peninsula and south of the Crinan Canal. It includes Loch Sween, Loch Caolisport and the Knapdale Forrest. The name is derived from the Gaelic 'cnap' meaning a small hill, and 'dail', a field.<br /> <br /> The island of Gigha is separated from the mainland by the Sound of Gigha. It is a small island, only 6 miles (10km) from north to south, with an area of 3447 acres. It was granted to the Lords of the Isles in the 14th century and given to the MacNeills in the 1490s. The island has changed hands many times, including a community buy out in 2002 by the people living there.<br /> <br /> This illustration is from 'Archaeological Sketches in Scotland: Knapdale and Gigha', by Captain TP White (1875)