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TITLE
Standing Stones leading to Iona
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_1862-1864_P048
DISTRICT
Mull
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon
DATE OF IMAGE
1864
PERIOD
1860s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31534
KEYWORDS
maps
stones
routes
markers
St Columba
saints
zoomable

On the Ross of Mull lies a line of standing stones, at approximately half mile intervals, which stretches from the point opposite Iona, where the ferry crossed, up to Pennycross. The stones stand about 6ft tall and are rough and unhewn. Locals say that they were intended as guide posts for visitors coming to Iona on pilgrimage.

Some say that the line originally stretched through Mull to Green Point, where the ferry to the mainland went from. This line would then indicate the path taken by St Columba when he set out to see Brude Mac Meilochon, the Pictish King, at the east end of Loch Ness. This would suggest that these stones are from the Christian era and are not Pictish.

This illustration can be found in vol. V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862.

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Standing Stones leading to Iona

ARGYLL: Kilfinchen and Kilvickeon

1860s

maps; stones; routes; markers; St Columba; saints; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (maps)

On the Ross of Mull lies a line of standing stones, at approximately half mile intervals, which stretches from the point opposite Iona, where the ferry crossed, up to Pennycross. The stones stand about 6ft tall and are rough and unhewn. Locals say that they were intended as guide posts for visitors coming to Iona on pilgrimage. <br /> <br /> Some say that the line originally stretched through Mull to Green Point, where the ferry to the mainland went from. This line would then indicate the path taken by St Columba when he set out to see Brude Mac Meilochon, the Pictish King, at the east end of Loch Ness. This would suggest that these stones are from the Christian era and are not Pictish.<br /> <br /> This illustration can be found in vol. V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862.