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TITLE
Crannogs at Loch of the Clans
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_1862-1864_P116
PLACENAME
Loch of the Clans
DISTRICT
Nairn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
NAIRN: Croy and Dalcross
DATE OF IMAGE
1864
PERIOD
1860s
CREATOR
W & A K Johnston
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31536
KEYWORDS
crannogs
islands
buildings
defense
construction
lochs
artificial
zoomable

This diagram shows crannogs on the estate of James Rose of Kilravock, Nairnshire. The area shown as Loch of the Clans is now an extinct loch.

Crannogs were small artificial islands used as defensive homesteads or status symbols. In some cases the crannogs were entirely man-made but in others they were based on natural islands. The islands were built and inhabited as recently as the 17th century.

Most crannogs were circular or oval with an average diameter of 15-30m. In general, crannogs in the Hebrides were made of stone while those on the mainland were usually of wood.

Many crannogs were associated with clans who enlarged them. One example is Priory Island (or the Isle of Loch Tay) in Loch Tay. The Campbells of Glenorchy built a fort on the island in the 16th century.

This illustration is from vol.V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862

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Crannogs at Loch of the Clans

NAIRN: Croy and Dalcross

1860s

crannogs; islands; buildings; defense; construction; lochs; artificial; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (maps)

This diagram shows crannogs on the estate of James Rose of Kilravock, Nairnshire. The area shown as Loch of the Clans is now an extinct loch.<br /> <br /> Crannogs were small artificial islands used as defensive homesteads or status symbols. In some cases the crannogs were entirely man-made but in others they were based on natural islands. The islands were built and inhabited as recently as the 17th century. <br /> <br /> Most crannogs were circular or oval with an average diameter of 15-30m. In general, crannogs in the Hebrides were made of stone while those on the mainland were usually of wood.<br /> <br /> Many crannogs were associated with clans who enlarged them. One example is Priory Island (or the Isle of Loch Tay) in Loch Tay. The Campbells of Glenorchy built a fort on the island in the 16th century.<br /> <br /> This illustration is from vol.V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862