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TITLE
Tumulus at Edderton
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_1862-1864_P301
PLACENAME
Edderton
DISTRICT
Tain
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Edderton
DATE OF IMAGE
1864
PERIOD
1860s
CREATOR
A Jervise
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31544
KEYWORDS
beads
cists
excavations
archaeology
pots
zoomable

This tumulus was discovered near Edderton along the Ross-shire railway during railway works. After careful digging a clay urn was discovered. It had a diameter of 16 inches at the top and 9 at the bottom. It was 16 inches high. It had no ornamentation and contained incinerated bones and some bronze.

Also discovered was a bead of blue glass with three white, concentric spirals and an irregular yellow streak. According to tradition it is known as an 'adder bead'. These beads were supposedly created by snakes putting their heads together and hissing until a bubble is formed. The bubble hardens like glass. Such beads were said to bring prosperity and healing.

This illustration can be found in vol.V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862

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Tumulus at Edderton

ROSS: Edderton

1860s

beads; cists; excavations; archaeology; pots; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (maps)

This tumulus was discovered near Edderton along the Ross-shire railway during railway works. After careful digging a clay urn was discovered. It had a diameter of 16 inches at the top and 9 at the bottom. It was 16 inches high. It had no ornamentation and contained incinerated bones and some bronze. <br /> <br /> Also discovered was a bead of blue glass with three white, concentric spirals and an irregular yellow streak. According to tradition it is known as an 'adder bead'. These beads were supposedly created by snakes putting their heads together and hissing until a bubble is formed. The bubble hardens like glass. Such beads were said to bring prosperity and healing.<br /> <br /> This illustration can be found in vol.V of the 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries in Scotland', 1860-1862