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TITLE
Interview with Agnes Milne about camaraderie in the WAAF
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF03_TRACK01_MILNE_01
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Agnes Milne
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3157
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
comradeship
friendship
Armed Forces
RAF
audio

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Agnes Milne describes the camaraderie among women in the WAAF during World War 2.

But there was a wonderful, wonderful, wonderful sense of camaraderie. Everyone helped everyone else. We had a huge hamper delivered to the WAAF section. It was from the American Forces. These were things for the girls: there was talcum powder, and Lux - I still use Lux soap - Lux toilet, a huge bar, and we all got something and I got the big bar of Lux toilet soap. 'Now,' I said, 'only if you're meeting someone terribly exciting are you allowed to use this, but you only must wash yourself once, not twice, and then dry it, put it back in the box for the next -' So that soap lasted a long time. And then there were some lipsticks - vile colours, and I think three of the girls had lipsticks but we all sort of used the same lipstick. But again, that was it. Everyone helped everyone else. Everyone helped.

Every Tuesday night we had make-do-and-mend night and we all had to stay in and clean our buttons and do any mending that had to be done on our uniform. And then, it took us about an hour, an hour and a half, we were finished by 9.00. We used to gather round the stove. We had the stoves - they were about that height, iron stoves, and this circumference, like that - and you filled them up with coke and lit the bottom. And it took about half an hour, but they glowed - I mean, it would never be allowed nowadays - they glowed and it was lovely. We used to sit there with our cocoa. Of course, you know, at that age, your conversation was not about knitting. It was about young men: 'Oh, he's beautiful!'; 'He's got golden curls'; 'He's got blue eyes'; 'Don't speak to him, he's horrible!' I expect that it's not very different today. But this was it. It was just the same. Then, when the war was over, and you went home, you really missed it. I miss all the friendship.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Agnes Milne about camaraderie in the WAAF

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; comradeship; friendship; Armed Forces; RAF; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Agnes Milne describes the camaraderie among women in the WAAF during World War 2.<br /> <br /> But there was a wonderful, wonderful, wonderful sense of camaraderie. Everyone helped everyone else. We had a huge hamper delivered to the WAAF section. It was from the American Forces. These were things for the girls: there was talcum powder, and Lux - I still use Lux soap - Lux toilet, a huge bar, and we all got something and I got the big bar of Lux toilet soap. 'Now,' I said, 'only if you're meeting someone terribly exciting are you allowed to use this, but you only must wash yourself once, not twice, and then dry it, put it back in the box for the next -' So that soap lasted a long time. And then there were some lipsticks - vile colours, and I think three of the girls had lipsticks but we all sort of used the same lipstick. But again, that was it. Everyone helped everyone else. Everyone helped. <br /> <br /> Every Tuesday night we had make-do-and-mend night and we all had to stay in and clean our buttons and do any mending that had to be done on our uniform. And then, it took us about an hour, an hour and a half, we were finished by 9.00. We used to gather round the stove. We had the stoves - they were about that height, iron stoves, and this circumference, like that - and you filled them up with coke and lit the bottom. And it took about half an hour, but they glowed - I mean, it would never be allowed nowadays - they glowed and it was lovely. We used to sit there with our cocoa. Of course, you know, at that age, your conversation was not about knitting. It was about young men: 'Oh, he's beautiful!'; 'He's got golden curls'; 'He's got blue eyes'; 'Don't speak to him, he's horrible!' I expect that it's not very different today. But this was it. It was just the same. Then, when the war was over, and you went home, you really missed it. I miss all the friendship. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.