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TITLE
Section of a building found in South Uist
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_P125
PLACENAME
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31576
KEYWORDS
buildings
sand
South Uist
brochs
Picts
houses
excavations
Section of a building found in South Uist

This building was found on the west shore of South Uist when Mr C Gordon, son of Colonel Gordon of Cluny, opened up a sand mound.

The remains of a circular building were found to have a diameter of about 12ft. The walls were about 5ft thick and 8ft high, and the building had two entrances.

It has been suggested that the building has links with the brochs (stone towers) and 'Pictish houses' found in Orkney and Shetland, but the South Uist building differs in a number of ways, including the fact that it has two entrances and the others have one.

This illustration is taken from 'The Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' vol.3

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Section of a building found in South Uist

INVERNESS: South Uist

buildings; sand; South Uist; brochs; Picts; houses; excavations

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

This building was found on the west shore of South Uist when Mr C Gordon, son of Colonel Gordon of Cluny, opened up a sand mound.<br /> <br /> The remains of a circular building were found to have a diameter of about 12ft. The walls were about 5ft thick and 8ft high, and the building had two entrances.<br /> <br /> It has been suggested that the building has links with the brochs (stone towers) and 'Pictish houses' found in Orkney and Shetland, but the South Uist building differs in a number of ways, including the fact that it has two entrances and the others have one.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' vol.3