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TITLE
Standing Stones at Calanais
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_P212
PLACENAME
Calanais
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Uig
PERIOD
2000BC
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31592
KEYWORDS
Calanais
Callanish
standing stones
stones
circles
stone circles
monuments
Lewis
peat
tombs
Standing Stones at Calanais

This collection of standing stones is now known as Calanais II. The elliptical shape includes stones which are standing and some which have fallen over. The stones range in height from 2m - 3.3m. A ruined cairn lies to the east of the centre of the ring.

The site was abandoned in about 800BC and it gradually began to disappear under the peat. When it was cleared in 1858 five holes were found containing charcoal. It has been suggested that these may have been post holes and that there may have been a wooden circle within the stone circle.

This illustration is taken from 'The Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' vol.3

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Standing Stones at Calanais

ROSS: Uig

2000BC

Calanais; Callanish; standing stones; stones; circles; stone circles; monuments; Lewis; peat; tombs

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

This collection of standing stones is now known as Calanais II. The elliptical shape includes stones which are standing and some which have fallen over. The stones range in height from 2m - 3.3m. A ruined cairn lies to the east of the centre of the ring.<br /> <br /> The site was abandoned in about 800BC and it gradually began to disappear under the peat. When it was cleared in 1858 five holes were found containing charcoal. It has been suggested that these may have been post holes and that there may have been a wooden circle within the stone circle.<br /> <br /> This illustration is taken from 'The Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland' vol.3