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TITLE
Interview with Agnes Milne about losing comrades in battle
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF03_TRACK04_MILNE_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Agnes Milne
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3162
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
comradeship
friendship
RAF
WAAF
Armed Forces
audio

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Agnes Milne reflects on coping strategies when men were lost during World War 2.

Well, as I said, the planes were fighter, fighter planes, Spitfires, fighters. And we had three squadrons, as I say, and they had - The defence was west coast, you know, and when the bombers came over, our boys took off and obviously tried to shoot them down. And then they also did escort work for the bombers going, well mostly to Europe, all to Europe. And we lost a lot of young men; a lot of young men in their twenties were lost at that time. But you know, I don't know if it was maybe the atmosphere or what, but you didn't talk about it. You knew that these people were missing, but you didn't, you didn't talk about it; it wasn't mentioned. But you felt it, you felt quite sad. And I think, as you grow older, the significance of it is more for you, because when you're seventeen, eighteen - and in those days we were very innocent seventeen and eighteen-year-olds - we didn't, I don't know, we weren't sort of encouraged to go out in the world in any way. And I think probably, I laid a wreath at Cawdor War Memorial this last November on behalf of the Cawdor Church, and it really touched me and I thought gosh, it's sixty years ago, but you don't forget these things, not really. But this went on, it just went on. You became sort of used to it, the people missing, you know, and you didn't say 'Where are they?'; you didn't talk about it. I think this is probably a way of ignoring it really.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Agnes Milne about losing comrades in battle

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; comradeship; friendship; RAF; WAAF; Armed Forces; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Agnes Milne reflects on coping strategies when men were lost during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Well, as I said, the planes were fighter, fighter planes, Spitfires, fighters. And we had three squadrons, as I say, and they had - The defence was west coast, you know, and when the bombers came over, our boys took off and obviously tried to shoot them down. And then they also did escort work for the bombers going, well mostly to Europe, all to Europe. And we lost a lot of young men; a lot of young men in their twenties were lost at that time. But you know, I don't know if it was maybe the atmosphere or what, but you didn't talk about it. You knew that these people were missing, but you didn't, you didn't talk about it; it wasn't mentioned. But you felt it, you felt quite sad. And I think, as you grow older, the significance of it is more for you, because when you're seventeen, eighteen - and in those days we were very innocent seventeen and eighteen-year-olds - we didn't, I don't know, we weren't sort of encouraged to go out in the world in any way. And I think probably, I laid a wreath at Cawdor War Memorial this last November on behalf of the Cawdor Church, and it really touched me and I thought gosh, it's sixty years ago, but you don't forget these things, not really. But this went on, it just went on. You became sort of used to it, the people missing, you know, and you didn't say 'Where are they?'; you didn't talk about it. I think this is probably a way of ignoring it really. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.