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TITLE
Cross section of quern and wooden frame
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P262
DISTRICT
North Yell, Shetland
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1860s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31632
KEYWORDS
querns
stones
mills
milling
grain
flour
production
Cross section of quern and wooden frame

A quern is a simple stone mill for grinding corn by hand. It is made from two round, flat stones placed one on top of the other. The top stone is turned by a handle and has an opening in the top to add the grain. Although a quern was usually worked by hand, the handle of the top stone was sometimes turned by a water wheel. This quern was found in a cottage in North Yell, Shetland. The stones rested on a wooden frame the back of which was attached to the wall and the front rested on two legs. The upper stone could be raised or lowered so that the quern could grind coarse or fine meal.

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

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Cross section of quern and wooden frame

1860s

querns; stones; mills; milling; grain; flour; production

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

A quern is a simple stone mill for grinding corn by hand. It is made from two round, flat stones placed one on top of the other. The top stone is turned by a handle and has an opening in the top to add the grain. Although a quern was usually worked by hand, the handle of the top stone was sometimes turned by a water wheel. This quern was found in a cottage in North Yell, Shetland. The stones rested on a wooden frame the back of which was attached to the wall and the front rested on two legs. The upper stone could be raised or lowered so that the quern could grind coarse or fine meal.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)