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TITLE
Interview with Major-General Robertson about losing comrades in battle
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF03_TRACK05_ROBERTSON_02
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Major-General Robertson
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3164
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
comradeship
friendship
army
Armed Forces
audio

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Major-General Robertson remembers losing comrades during World War 2.

Of course, it was a terrible thing when your friends were wounded or killed. We hadn't really seen any casualties until El Alamein and we'd all been training together and lived together for two years and knew each other so well. We were all fit and we were all quite sure that nothing would happen to us and that bullets would bounce off us. And then we had the battle and the casualty names came in and you heard that so-and-so had been killed and you said, 'Oh no, not possible!' And that was very saddening. Unfortunately, the trouble about war is, you get hardened to it, you get hardened to it. You get used to being killed and you don't bother about it; you just pass by. 'Oh, he's dead. Bad luck.' And that's the tragedy about war.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Major-General Robertson about losing comrades in battle

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; comradeship; friendship; army; Armed Forces; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Major-General Robertson remembers losing comrades during World War 2.<br /> <br /> Of course, it was a terrible thing when your friends were wounded or killed. We hadn't really seen any casualties until El Alamein and we'd all been training together and lived together for two years and knew each other so well. We were all fit and we were all quite sure that nothing would happen to us and that bullets would bounce off us. And then we had the battle and the casualty names came in and you heard that so-and-so had been killed and you said, 'Oh no, not possible!' And that was very saddening. Unfortunately, the trouble about war is, you get hardened to it, you get hardened to it. You get used to being killed and you don't bother about it; you just pass by. 'Oh, he's dead. Bad luck.' And that's the tragedy about war. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.