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TITLE
Ground plan of the Broch of Coldoch, Perthshire
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P324
PLACENAME
Coldoch
DISTRICT
Western
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
PERTH
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31650
KEYWORDS
brochs
buildings
iron age
stones
dwellings
walls
chambers
cells
zoomable

Plan of the Coldoch Broch on the north side of the Forth Valley. The plans are similar to those of the Mousa broch in Shetland and the broch at Tappock, or Torwood, in Stirlingshire.

This broch is unusual because of its geographical location. Most brochs are found on the northern tip of the Scottish mainland and on the Northern Isles but there are others found in the Highlands and Western Isles. These Iron Age structures are unique to Scotland. A typical broch measures around 5-13m high and is a circular 2-storey drystone building. Inside is a main chamber with smaller cells branching off it and a stone staircase within the broch's double walls.

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

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Ground plan of the Broch of Coldoch, Perthshire

PERTH

1870s

brochs; buildings; iron age; stones; dwellings; walls; chambers; cells; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (maps)

Plan of the Coldoch Broch on the north side of the Forth Valley. The plans are similar to those of the Mousa broch in Shetland and the broch at Tappock, or Torwood, in Stirlingshire.<br /> <br /> This broch is unusual because of its geographical location. Most brochs are found on the northern tip of the Scottish mainland and on the Northern Isles but there are others found in the Highlands and Western Isles. These Iron Age structures are unique to Scotland. A typical broch measures around 5-13m high and is a circular 2-storey drystone building. Inside is a main chamber with smaller cells branching off it and a stone staircase within the broch's double walls.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)