Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Stones of Stenness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P348A
PLACENAME
Stenness
DISTRICT
Mainland Orkney
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31653
KEYWORDS
stones
standing stones
rings
megaliths
circles
Stones of Stenness

The Stones of Stenness stand by the Loch of Stenness just off the main Stromness to Kirkwall road on the Orkney mainland. The ring originally had 12 stones which were put in place sometime between 3000 and 2500 BC. This would have been around the same time as Maes Howe but much earlier than the Ring of Brodgar a little to the north.

In 1814 only four of the stones were still standing and by the winter of 1814 another of the circle stones and an outlying stone had been toppled by a farmer, resentful of visitors tramping across the fields to see them. Since then the toppled stone within the circle has been re-erected. The tallest of the remaining stones is 5.7m (19ft) tall but this may not have been the tallest of the original stones. The time taken to erect the circle is believed to have been approximately 5,000 working days.

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Stones of Stenness

1870s

stones; standing stones; rings; megaliths; circles

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

The Stones of Stenness stand by the Loch of Stenness just off the main Stromness to Kirkwall road on the Orkney mainland. The ring originally had 12 stones which were put in place sometime between 3000 and 2500 BC. This would have been around the same time as Maes Howe but much earlier than the Ring of Brodgar a little to the north.<br /> <br /> In 1814 only four of the stones were still standing and by the winter of 1814 another of the circle stones and an outlying stone had been toppled by a farmer, resentful of visitors tramping across the fields to see them. Since then the toppled stone within the circle has been re-erected. The tallest of the remaining stones is 5.7m (19ft) tall but this may not have been the tallest of the original stones. The time taken to erect the circle is believed to have been approximately 5,000 working days.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)