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TITLE
Headstones at Cladh a' Bhile
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P362
PLACENAME
Cladh a' Bhile
DISTRICT
Mid Argyll
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: South Knapdale
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31658
KEYWORDS
tombstones
graves
grave markers
stones
carvings
burials
burial grounds
cemeteries
Headstones at Cladh a' Bhile

The burial ground of Cladh a' Bhile is near the village of Ellary by the side of Loch Caolisport. Carved and decorated tombstones were found at Cladh a' Bhile and there is a collection of 29 cross slabs. The name means 'burial ground of the sacred tree' and the cemetery may have been an early monastic site. The grave stones probably date from the 8th century and were 'chip carved'. Chip carving is the removal of chips from the surface to produce a design below the original surface. This helped to protect the carving from damage.

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

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Headstones at Cladh a' Bhile

ARGYLL: South Knapdale

1870s

tombstones; graves; grave markers; stones; carvings; burials; burial grounds; cemeteries

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

The burial ground of Cladh a' Bhile is near the village of Ellary by the side of Loch Caolisport. Carved and decorated tombstones were found at Cladh a' Bhile and there is a collection of 29 cross slabs. The name means 'burial ground of the sacred tree' and the cemetery may have been an early monastic site. The grave stones probably date from the 8th century and were 'chip carved'. Chip carving is the removal of chips from the surface to produce a design below the original surface. This helped to protect the carving from damage.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)