Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Highland Dirk
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P377
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31659
KEYWORDS
daggers
knives
swords
dirks
weapons
blades
engravings
Highland Dirk

This Highland Dirk is distinct from European dirks in that the blade only has one edge. The blade of a dirk was weighted so that it could also be used as a short sword as well as a stabbing knife. This dirk was 42cm (16½ inches) long. The blade was 32cm (12½ inches) long and 4cm (1½ inches) wide where it joined the handle. The handle was of dark wood and carved with an interlaced design with a circular brass mounting on top. The blade is inscribed on both sides. One side reads 'A soft ansuer tourneth away wrath' and the other 'Thy King and Countries Cause defend though on the spot your life should end.'

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Highland Dirk

1870s

daggers; knives; swords; dirks; weapons; blades; engravings

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

This Highland Dirk is distinct from European dirks in that the blade only has one edge. The blade of a dirk was weighted so that it could also be used as a short sword as well as a stabbing knife. This dirk was 42cm (16½ inches) long. The blade was 32cm (12½ inches) long and 4cm (1½ inches) wide where it joined the handle. The handle was of dark wood and carved with an interlaced design with a circular brass mounting on top. The blade is inscribed on both sides. One side reads 'A soft ansuer tourneth away wrath' and the other 'Thy King and Countries Cause defend though on the spot your life should end.'<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)