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TITLE
Stern post of a boat
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2471_VOLXII_P595
DATE OF IMAGE
1876
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31674
KEYWORDS
posts
boats
building methods
ships
sea vessels
Stern post of a boat

This illustration shows one of two pieces of carved wood about six feet long which were discovered while draining moss at Laig on the Isle of Eigg. It has been suggested that they are the stem and stern posts of a boat. This carved piece of oak wood is probably from the Viking boatbuilding tradition. The post has a stepped edge for fitting timbers to it.

Vikings built boats by riveting together overlapping planks. This is known as clinker building. The post is curved which was a common feature of Viking boats. It was probably soaked to make the wood easier to work with.

This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)

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Stern post of a boat

1870s

posts; boats; building methods; ships; sea vessels

Highland Libraries

Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (illustrations)

This illustration shows one of two pieces of carved wood about six feet long which were discovered while draining moss at Laig on the Isle of Eigg. It has been suggested that they are the stem and stern posts of a boat. This carved piece of oak wood is probably from the Viking boatbuilding tradition. The post has a stepped edge for fitting timbers to it. <br /> <br /> Vikings built boats by riveting together overlapping planks. This is known as clinker building. The post is curved which was a common feature of Viking boats. It was probably soaked to make the wood easier to work with.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. Vol XII, Part I' (1876-77)