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TITLE
Pillar at Shandwick, West Side
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2475_1_P001
PLACENAME
Shandwick
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Nigg
DATE OF IMAGE
1857
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31675
KEYWORDS
Pictish stones
carved stones
carvings
standing stones
cemeteries
crosses
Pillar at Shandwick, West Side

Carved in relief on both faces, Pictish standing stones remain something of a mystery. The later slabs usually contain a cross as well as numerous Pictish symbols which may have mythological or religious meanings. However, as many symbols appear in pairs they may designate particular lineages or kindreds. These stones are only found around the north-east coast and three of the finest examples of this type were produced in the Tarbat peninsula, including this one at Shandwick.

Gradually, between 600 and 800 AD, most of the Picts were converted to Christianity. It is during this time that the carved stones for which the Picts are renowned were produced.

The 3m tall stone at Shandwick is designated a Class 2 stone. A Class 2 Pictish stone is regarded as a major work of art dating from the 8th and 9th centuries. They are rectangular slabs, usually of sandstone, decorated with Pictish symbols and Christian motifs.

Facing the sea, the cross is covered with bosses and interlocking spirals. On the other side are five decorative panels - a double-disc symbol of a beast, a hunting scene, fighting swordsmen, a hunter with a crossbow, and serpents biting themselves.

It's Gaelic name, Clach a' Charaidh, means 'stone of the grave-plots' and there are records of a burial ground here which was last used during the cholera epidemic of 1832 and was 'ploughed under' c.1885.

This stone is now enclosed in a glass case to protect it from the elements.

This plate is taken from 'A Short Account of some Carved Stones in Ross-shire, accompanied with a series of Outline Engravings' by Charles Carter Petley and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol IV (1857)

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Pillar at Shandwick, West Side

ROSS: Nigg

Pictish stones; carved stones; carvings; standing stones; cemeteries; crosses

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Carved in relief on both faces, Pictish standing stones remain something of a mystery. The later slabs usually contain a cross as well as numerous Pictish symbols which may have mythological or religious meanings. However, as many symbols appear in pairs they may designate particular lineages or kindreds. These stones are only found around the north-east coast and three of the finest examples of this type were produced in the Tarbat peninsula, including this one at Shandwick.<br /> <br /> Gradually, between 600 and 800 AD, most of the Picts were converted to Christianity. It is during this time that the carved stones for which the Picts are renowned were produced.<br /> <br /> The 3m tall stone at Shandwick is designated a Class 2 stone. A Class 2 Pictish stone is regarded as a major work of art dating from the 8th and 9th centuries. They are rectangular slabs, usually of sandstone, decorated with Pictish symbols and Christian motifs. <br /> <br /> Facing the sea, the cross is covered with bosses and interlocking spirals. On the other side are five decorative panels - a double-disc symbol of a beast, a hunting scene, fighting swordsmen, a hunter with a crossbow, and serpents biting themselves.<br /> <br /> It's Gaelic name, Clach a' Charaidh, means 'stone of the grave-plots' and there are records of a burial ground here which was last used during the cholera epidemic of 1832 and was 'ploughed under' c.1885.<br /> <br /> This stone is now enclosed in a glass case to protect it from the elements.<br /> <br /> This plate is taken from 'A Short Account of some Carved Stones in Ross-shire, accompanied with a series of Outline Engravings' by Charles Carter Petley and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol IV (1857)