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TITLE
Interview with Agnes Milne about meeting war-time celebrities
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF04_TRACK02_MILNE
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Agnes Milne
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3168
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
nightclubs
musicians
singer
singers
audio

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Agnes Milne met some celebrities in clubs for the Forces during World War 2..

This nightclub, a very high class place it was, so I believe, it was bombed and Lord Nuffield - the late Lord, I think, I don't think he's still alive, he'll be dead now, yes - the late Lord Nuffield took this over and built it up as a place for servicemen and servicewomen of all nationalities and all ranks to go and well, it was just wonderful. Particularly, the fact you couldn't get Lux toilet soap and we used to share a bit of Lifebuoy soap, and that kind of thing. You walked in and there were some ladies there and they took your uni- They took you to a cubicle, took your uniform, your shoes, and your shoes, your uniform, and gave you this lovely pink robe. You put it on and you went and had your hair shampooed and set. Then you had a facial - I haven't had a facial since - then you had a facial and the make-up was put on. This was something else: it's not terribly hygienic but we used to share a lipstick.

And then, the tables were set in a circle and you went and had something to eat and downstairs, you went down a sort of ironwork stairway to the dance floor, down at the bottom, and one time, when I was in London, Glenn Miller was playing in this club and that was just before, I think he was lost over the Channel. We went there and we were sitting there and the young men who were playing in the band, if they weren't needed to play any particular tune, they used to come and ask the girls to dance, you see. I was sitting there with my two friends - both much better looking than I was, I must say - my two friends, but the thing was, we all had very bright red hair, so this was probably why the young man came up and he asked me to dance, you see. Well, I talk a lot really, but I was so overcome, I didn't say a word. I liked it so much. And I discovered - this will mean nothing to you young people; again, your grandparents will know - the young man was Harry James, the musician who eventually married Betty Grable, so I was terribly honoured.

And then there was another club in London that they had called the Stage Door Canteen. It was run by American ladies, older(??) American ladies, and all the film stars used to come when they came to London to entertain the American services, came to this club. And we went there. I was there once when Bing Crosby was there, and yes, making raffles and singing his famous golfing song, 'Straight down the middle'. He was there and one or two celebrities, so it was quite exciting, you know, when you're seventeen, eighteen.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Agnes Milne about meeting war-time celebrities

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; nightclubs; musicians; singer; singers; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Agnes Milne met some celebrities in clubs for the Forces during World War 2..<br /> <br /> This nightclub, a very high class place it was, so I believe, it was bombed and Lord Nuffield - the late Lord, I think, I don't think he's still alive, he'll be dead now, yes - the late Lord Nuffield took this over and built it up as a place for servicemen and servicewomen of all nationalities and all ranks to go and well, it was just wonderful. Particularly, the fact you couldn't get Lux toilet soap and we used to share a bit of Lifebuoy soap, and that kind of thing. You walked in and there were some ladies there and they took your uni- They took you to a cubicle, took your uniform, your shoes, and your shoes, your uniform, and gave you this lovely pink robe. You put it on and you went and had your hair shampooed and set. Then you had a facial - I haven't had a facial since - then you had a facial and the make-up was put on. This was something else: it's not terribly hygienic but we used to share a lipstick. <br /> <br /> And then, the tables were set in a circle and you went and had something to eat and downstairs, you went down a sort of ironwork stairway to the dance floor, down at the bottom, and one time, when I was in London, Glenn Miller was playing in this club and that was just before, I think he was lost over the Channel. We went there and we were sitting there and the young men who were playing in the band, if they weren't needed to play any particular tune, they used to come and ask the girls to dance, you see. I was sitting there with my two friends - both much better looking than I was, I must say - my two friends, but the thing was, we all had very bright red hair, so this was probably why the young man came up and he asked me to dance, you see. Well, I talk a lot really, but I was so overcome, I didn't say a word. I liked it so much. And I discovered - this will mean nothing to you young people; again, your grandparents will know - the young man was Harry James, the musician who eventually married Betty Grable, so I was terribly honoured. <br /> <br /> And then there was another club in London that they had called the Stage Door Canteen. It was run by American ladies, older(??) American ladies, and all the film stars used to come when they came to London to entertain the American services, came to this club. And we went there. I was there once when Bing Crosby was there, and yes, making raffles and singing his famous golfing song, 'Straight down the middle'. He was there and one or two celebrities, so it was quite exciting, you know, when you're seventeen, eighteen. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.