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TITLE
The Older Crozier of St Fillan
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2475_2_P378
DATE OF IMAGE
1890
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31694
KEYWORDS
saints
missionaries
crosier
The Older Crozier of St Fillan

This is said to be the 'quigrich', or pastoral staff, of St Fillan showing the crosier head of copper within the silver casing. It was considered to have magical properties in the recovery of stolen goods.

St Fillan came originally from Ireland and arrived at Glendochart around 730 AD. He built a priory near Auchtertyre in Strathfillan. He entrusted his relics to the custody of laymen in Glendochart rather than the monks of the priory. Such men were called 'deòradh' (Gaelic for stranger) which gave rise to the surname Dewar.

The quigrich stayed with the same family in Glendochart for around 900 years until, after falling on hard times, it was sold to the McDonnells of Glengarry. However, the Dewars' fortunes worsened until eventually, and with some difficulty, they bought it back.

Though no longer used to locate stolen property it was believed that water in which the staff had been dipped could cure sick cattle.

Only the head of the quigrich remains (silver-gilt with a smaller crozier of bronze inclosed within it) and this was placed in the National Museum of Antiquities in Edinburgh by Alexander Dewar.

This plate is taken from 'The Quigrich or Crosier of St Fillan' and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol V (1890)

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The Older Crozier of St Fillan

saints; missionaries; crosier

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

This is said to be the 'quigrich', or pastoral staff, of St Fillan showing the crosier head of copper within the silver casing. It was considered to have magical properties in the recovery of stolen goods.<br /> <br /> St Fillan came originally from Ireland and arrived at Glendochart around 730 AD. He built a priory near Auchtertyre in Strathfillan. He entrusted his relics to the custody of laymen in Glendochart rather than the monks of the priory. Such men were called 'deòradh' (Gaelic for stranger) which gave rise to the surname Dewar.<br /> <br /> The quigrich stayed with the same family in Glendochart for around 900 years until, after falling on hard times, it was sold to the McDonnells of Glengarry. However, the Dewars' fortunes worsened until eventually, and with some difficulty, they bought it back.<br /> <br /> Though no longer used to locate stolen property it was believed that water in which the staff had been dipped could cure sick cattle.<br /> <br /> Only the head of the quigrich remains (silver-gilt with a smaller crozier of bronze inclosed within it) and this was placed in the National Museum of Antiquities in Edinburgh by Alexander Dewar.<br /> <br /> This plate is taken from 'The Quigrich or Crosier of St Fillan' and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol V (1890)