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TITLE
Broch of Burrian, North Ronaldsay
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2475_2_P379
PLACENAME
Burrian
DISTRICT
North Ronaldsay
DATE OF IMAGE
1890
PERIOD
1890s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31695
KEYWORDS
Burrain
Picts
Orkney

zoomable

The Broch of Burrian is situated on a promontory in the southeast of North Ronaldsay. It is separated from the surrounding arable land by four earthen ramparts. It was excavated in the 1880s and stood at the centre of an extensive Iron Age settlement. Some archaeological finds show Pictish symbols whilst others, including an iron hand-bell and a cross-slab, suggest the site was later used for ecclesiastical purposes. The last-mentioned 'Burrian Cross' has become a common design in modern Orcadian jewellery. Significant remains of the broch must have survived into the Norse period to have gained the name 'Burrian' (from 'borg-in', the fortress.) The Site is in the Guardianship of the Secretary of State for Scotland.

This plate is taken from 'Results of Excavations at the Broch of Burrian, North Ronaldsay, Orkney, during the Summers of 1870 and 1871' by William Trail and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol V (1890)

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Broch of Burrian, North Ronaldsay

1890s

Burrain; Picts; Orkney; ; zoomable

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (maps)

The Broch of Burrian is situated on a promontory in the southeast of North Ronaldsay. It is separated from the surrounding arable land by four earthen ramparts. It was excavated in the 1880s and stood at the centre of an extensive Iron Age settlement. Some archaeological finds show Pictish symbols whilst others, including an iron hand-bell and a cross-slab, suggest the site was later used for ecclesiastical purposes. The last-mentioned 'Burrian Cross' has become a common design in modern Orcadian jewellery. Significant remains of the broch must have survived into the Norse period to have gained the name 'Burrian' (from 'borg-in', the fortress.) The Site is in the Guardianship of the Secretary of State for Scotland.<br /> <br /> This plate is taken from 'Results of Excavations at the Broch of Burrian, North Ronaldsay, Orkney, during the Summers of 1870 and 1871' by William Trail and published in 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland', vol V (1890)