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TITLE
Designs from the Hilton of Cadboll stone
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_2475_P004
PLACENAME
Hilton of Cadboll
DISTRICT
Fearn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Fearn
DATE OF IMAGE
1857
PERIOD
1850s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31708
KEYWORDS
Pictish stones
stones
carved stones
carvings
Picts
standing stones
symbols
Designs from the Hilton of Cadboll stone

The cross slab at Hilton of Cadboll stood beside the ruined medieval chapel of St Mary's until 1676 when the ornamentation on the cross side was chiselled off so that the stone could be used as a grave slab. The stone was too heavy to move and was discarded. The stone was later removed to Invergordon Castle and then the British Museum in London before being moved to the National Museum in Edinburgh where it remains.

This illustration shows examples of two of the knotwork designs on the stone, a disc and a diamond. Although they look fairly intricate in this drawing, they would be even more impressive carved in relief on a stone. The Pictish masons who carved the stone would have been highly skilled.

This plate is taken from 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol IV, part III'

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Designs from the Hilton of Cadboll stone

ROSS: Fearn

1850s

Pictish stones; stones; carved stones; carvings; Picts; standing stones; symbols

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

The cross slab at Hilton of Cadboll stood beside the ruined medieval chapel of St Mary's until 1676 when the ornamentation on the cross side was chiselled off so that the stone could be used as a grave slab. The stone was too heavy to move and was discarded. The stone was later removed to Invergordon Castle and then the British Museum in London before being moved to the National Museum in Edinburgh where it remains.<br /> <br /> This illustration shows examples of two of the knotwork designs on the stone, a disc and a diamond. Although they look fairly intricate in this drawing, they would be even more impressive carved in relief on a stone. The Pictish masons who carved the stone would have been highly skilled.<br /> <br /> This plate is taken from 'Archaeologia Scotica or Transactions of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol IV, part III'