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TITLE
Interview with Agnes Milne about the end of the war
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF05_TRACK02_MILNE
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Agnes Milne
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3172
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
parades
celebration
celebrations
Armed Forces
audio

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Agnes Milne took part in the Victory Parade in London at the end of World War 2.

Another thing, oh well, this is going on to the end of the war, when the war - The victory - I was chosen. I've been five seven, five eight, and I was often chosen for a lot of things that you needed someone tall to do, you see. So I was chosen to go on the Victory Parade in London. And we stood - it was a very hot day - we stood there in long, long rows and the King and Queen and Princess Royal - that's the King's sister, I think, yes the Princess Royal - she was the one who inspected us. We were the junior service, you see: the Navy first, the Army second and the RAF last. So the only thing (Should I say this? Yes, I will) the only thing I really remember about this lady: she had tremendously big feet. I was fascinated by her feet. These feet seemed to come round the corner slightly before her. I thought, Gosh! And then I thought, well, why are you laughing? You take a size seven!

And after the parade was over, well it's just unforgettable. We, every nationality, every service from the French, the Americans - the Americans, of course, yeah, with their gum - the Americans, the French - we were all there, dancing and kissing each other and we didn't know the people we were kissing. Dancing and kissing and singing until oh, it was, the sky was turning sort of grey by the time we got home. But when I see the crowds singing on television, I'm always look-, put my specs on, looking for myself, but I haven't found myself.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Agnes Milne about the end of the war

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; parades; celebration; celebrations; Armed Forces; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Agnes Milne took part in the Victory Parade in London at the end of World War 2.<br /> <br /> Another thing, oh well, this is going on to the end of the war, when the war - The victory - I was chosen. I've been five seven, five eight, and I was often chosen for a lot of things that you needed someone tall to do, you see. So I was chosen to go on the Victory Parade in London. And we stood - it was a very hot day - we stood there in long, long rows and the King and Queen and Princess Royal - that's the King's sister, I think, yes the Princess Royal - she was the one who inspected us. We were the junior service, you see: the Navy first, the Army second and the RAF last. So the only thing (Should I say this? Yes, I will) the only thing I really remember about this lady: she had tremendously big feet. I was fascinated by her feet. These feet seemed to come round the corner slightly before her. I thought, Gosh! And then I thought, well, why are you laughing? You take a size seven! <br /> <br /> And after the parade was over, well it's just unforgettable. We, every nationality, every service from the French, the Americans - the Americans, of course, yeah, with their gum - the Americans, the French - we were all there, dancing and kissing each other and we didn't know the people we were kissing. Dancing and kissing and singing until oh, it was, the sky was turning sort of grey by the time we got home. But when I see the crowds singing on television, I'm always look-, put my specs on, looking for myself, but I haven't found myself. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.