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TITLE
Interview with Major-General Robertson about the end of the war
EXTERNAL ID
WD_BF05_TRACK03_ROBERTSON
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Major-General Robertson
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3174
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
celebration
celebrations
audio

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Major-General Robertson remembers the silence once World War 2 came to an end.

What do you remember about the end of the war, most?

The thing I remember most about the end of the war, because I was teaching in England at the time, was that suddenly there was no noise at night. Before, every night there had been a roar of hundreds and hundreds of aeroplanes going over to bomb Germany and suddenly it was silent. I think it must have had the same effect as in the First War. People remember, in the First War, the thing that really struck them more than anything else, after hearing shells and bombs, all day and all night, suddenly that that was stopped and there was silence. And that was quite dramatic. And so we had to get out some champagne and drink that. [Laughter]

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.

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Interview with Major-General Robertson about the end of the war

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; celebration; celebrations; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Major-General Robertson remembers the silence once World War 2 came to an end.<br /> <br /> What do you remember about the end of the war, most?<br /> <br /> The thing I remember most about the end of the war, because I was teaching in England at the time, was that suddenly there was no noise at night. Before, every night there had been a roar of hundreds and hundreds of aeroplanes going over to bomb Germany and suddenly it was silent. I think it must have had the same effect as in the First War. People remember, in the First War, the thing that really struck them more than anything else, after hearing shells and bombs, all day and all night, suddenly that that was stopped and there was silence. And that was quite dramatic. And so we had to get out some champagne and drink that. [Laughter]<br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Cawdor Primary School.