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TITLE
Grey Friars Kirkyard, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_3289_P021
PLACENAME
Greyfriars Kirkyard
DISTRICT
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1875
PERIOD
1870s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31747
KEYWORDS
Inverness
Greyfriars Churchyard
cemeteries
yards
pillars
monasteries
religioned
Grey Friars Kirkyard, Inverness

In 1233 Alexander II granted the Dominican Friars some land in Inverness between Kirkgate (now Chapel Street) and the River Ness where they built their Priory. The number of friars appears to have been small in relation to their extensive buildings. This was because they aimed to attract large congregations and also because it was common for the buildings to be used as Royal residences when the Court was visiting.

There is some debate as to whether the Friars were Dominican or Black Friars as the remaining church yard is known as Greyfriars and Grey Friars were of the Franciscan order. It is acknowledged by most sources, however, that it was indeed Black or Dominican Friars who were in Inverness. Confusion may have arisen because both orders were introduced into Scotland at around the same time. This pillar in the church yard (which is now sandwiched between the telephone exchange buildings) is said to be the remains of the original choir of the Friary.

This engraving can be found in 'Invernessiana: Contributions toward A History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599', by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh. It is digitised from Fraser-Mackintosh's own copy, part of his book collection which is now held in Inverness Library

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Grey Friars Kirkyard, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1870s

Inverness; Greyfriars Churchyard; cemeteries; yards; pillars; monasteries; religioned

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

In 1233 Alexander II granted the Dominican Friars some land in Inverness between Kirkgate (now Chapel Street) and the River Ness where they built their Priory. The number of friars appears to have been small in relation to their extensive buildings. This was because they aimed to attract large congregations and also because it was common for the buildings to be used as Royal residences when the Court was visiting.<br /> <br /> There is some debate as to whether the Friars were Dominican or Black Friars as the remaining church yard is known as Greyfriars and Grey Friars were of the Franciscan order. It is acknowledged by most sources, however, that it was indeed Black or Dominican Friars who were in Inverness. Confusion may have arisen because both orders were introduced into Scotland at around the same time. This pillar in the church yard (which is now sandwiched between the telephone exchange buildings) is said to be the remains of the original choir of the Friary.<br /> <br /> This engraving can be found in 'Invernessiana: Contributions toward A History of the Town and Parish of Inverness, from 1160 to 1599', by Charles Fraser-Mackintosh. It is digitised from Fraser-Mackintosh's own copy, part of his book collection which is now held in Inverness Library