Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Lochindorb with its Castle Lodge and Sheilings
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_3443_P007
PLACENAME
Lochindorb
DISTRICT
Cromdale
PERIOD
1800s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31760
KEYWORDS
Lochindorb
castles
islands
lochs
moors
Lochindorb with its Castle Lodge and Sheilings

Lochindorb Castle was built on a partially-man-made island in the loch of the same name on Dava Moor, north west of Grantown-on-Spey. The name comes from the Gaelic 'Loch nan Doirb' meaning 'loch of trouble'.

The castle dates from the 13th century and was originally held by the Comyns before it was seized and occupied by the English. It was then used as a prison and a garrison for English troops before it was given by Robert II to his son, Alexander, the Wolf of Badenoch. It is said that he was based at Lochindorb when he sacked Elgin Cathedral in 1390.

The castle was forfeited to the crown by the Earl of Moray in 1455 and the Scottish Privy Council ordered the Thane of Cawdor to dismantle it. The large iron yett (gate) at the entrance to Cawdor Castle was originally at Lochindorb.

This illustration is one of a set bound with an anonymous manuscript entitled 'The Ancient and Honourable Family of Calder', from the Fraser-Mackintosh Collection at Inverness Library

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Lochindorb with its Castle Lodge and Sheilings

1800s

Lochindorb; castles; islands; lochs; moors

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Lochindorb Castle was built on a partially-man-made island in the loch of the same name on Dava Moor, north west of Grantown-on-Spey. The name comes from the Gaelic 'Loch nan Doirb' meaning 'loch of trouble'.<br /> <br /> The castle dates from the 13th century and was originally held by the Comyns before it was seized and occupied by the English. It was then used as a prison and a garrison for English troops before it was given by Robert II to his son, Alexander, the Wolf of Badenoch. It is said that he was based at Lochindorb when he sacked Elgin Cathedral in 1390.<br /> <br /> The castle was forfeited to the crown by the Earl of Moray in 1455 and the Scottish Privy Council ordered the Thane of Cawdor to dismantle it. The large iron yett (gate) at the entrance to Cawdor Castle was originally at Lochindorb.<br /> <br /> This illustration is one of a set bound with an anonymous manuscript entitled 'The Ancient and Honourable Family of Calder', from the Fraser-Mackintosh Collection at Inverness Library