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TITLE
Hugh Miller
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_21935_P460A
DATE OF IMAGE
1893
PERIOD
1840s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31767
KEYWORDS
Hugh Miller
famous people
geologists
writers
fossils
religion
journalists
Hugh Miller

Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. His sea captain father died when Hugh was five but had left enough money for him to be educated.

Hugh began his career as a stone mason but when the stone dust damaged his lungs he became a monumental mason and then a bank clerk in Edinburgh. His interest in geology led him to publish books on the subject and while in Edinburgh he became friends with the geologist Roderick Murchison.

Hugh's other main interest was church affairs. He edited the evangelical newspaper 'The Witness' and was a leader on the Free Church side when the Disruption of the Church of Scotland took place in 1843. His religious views directly opposed the emerging theories of evolution.

Pressures and conflicts in his life and work, as well as his ruined lungs, took their toll and in 1856 Hugh took his own life while suffering from depression.

This illustration was taken from 'Annals of the Disruption; with extracts from the narratives of Ministers who left the Scottish Establishment in 1843', by Rev Thomas Brown (1893)

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Hugh Miller

1840s

Hugh Miller; famous people; geologists; writers; fossils; religion; journalists

Highland Libraries

Fraser Mackintosh Collection (illustrations)

Hugh Miller was born in Cromarty in 1802. His sea captain father died when Hugh was five but had left enough money for him to be educated.<br /> <br /> Hugh began his career as a stone mason but when the stone dust damaged his lungs he became a monumental mason and then a bank clerk in Edinburgh. His interest in geology led him to publish books on the subject and while in Edinburgh he became friends with the geologist Roderick Murchison.<br /> <br /> Hugh's other main interest was church affairs. He edited the evangelical newspaper 'The Witness' and was a leader on the Free Church side when the Disruption of the Church of Scotland took place in 1843. His religious views directly opposed the emerging theories of evolution.<br /> <br /> Pressures and conflicts in his life and work, as well as his ruined lungs, took their toll and in 1856 Hugh took his own life while suffering from depression.<br /> <br /> This illustration was taken from 'Annals of the Disruption; with extracts from the narratives of Ministers who left the Scottish Establishment in 1843', by Rev Thomas Brown (1893)