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TITLE
Old Gordon Place, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_273369_014
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1900
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Pierre Delavault
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31771
KEYWORDS
drawings
visual art
houses
streets
Old Gordon Place, Inverness

This drawing of Old Gordon Place in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).

The description which accompanies this image explains that at the end of the 18th century the River Ness ran much closer to the foot of Bridge Street than it does now. In front of the houses at Gordon Place were small gardens sloping down to the water's edge but these virtually disappeared when the roadway was heightened to allow the erection of the suspension bridge in 1855.

When the houses of Gordon Place were taken down at the beginning of the 20th century, several interesting stones came to light, including an old lintel with the date '1604' engraved on it. The building erected to replace these houses revived the old name of 'Castle Tolmie', which had been used originally for a building demolished earlier on the north side of Bridge Street. This new Castle Tolmie was itself pulled down in 1959 to facilitate the demolition of the suspension bridge and its replacement by the three-arch concrete bridge which was opened in 1961.

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Old Gordon Place, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

drawings; visual art; houses; streets

Highland Libraries

Old Inverness by Pierre Delavault (1903)

This drawing of Old Gordon Place in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).<br /> <br /> The description which accompanies this image explains that at the end of the 18th century the River Ness ran much closer to the foot of Bridge Street than it does now. In front of the houses at Gordon Place were small gardens sloping down to the water's edge but these virtually disappeared when the roadway was heightened to allow the erection of the suspension bridge in 1855.<br /> <br /> When the houses of Gordon Place were taken down at the beginning of the 20th century, several interesting stones came to light, including an old lintel with the date '1604' engraved on it. The building erected to replace these houses revived the old name of 'Castle Tolmie', which had been used originally for a building demolished earlier on the north side of Bridge Street. This new Castle Tolmie was itself pulled down in 1959 to facilitate the demolition of the suspension bridge and its replacement by the three-arch concrete bridge which was opened in 1961.