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TITLE
Queen Mary's House, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_273369_017
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1902
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Pierre Delavault
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31772
KEYWORDS
drawings
visual art
houses
town houses
Queen Mary's House, Inverness

This drawing of Queen Mary's House in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).

The description which accompanies this image explains that Queen Mary's House stood at the corner of Bridge Street, facing the River Ness. Between it and the river used to stand 'Castle Tolmie' which was pulled down when the suspension bridge was built in 1852.

Queen Mary's house owes its name to the tradition that Mary, Queen of Scots, lodged there during a visit in 1562. In 1787, alterations and repairs were carried out by the owner, William Inglis of Kingsmills. At that time, the building was occupied by Messrs Fraser, Wilson & Co, Wine Merchants. The business was bought over by a succession of different wine merchants, as the thickness of the old walls produced an evenness of temperature very favourable to the storage of wine.

In 1967, when 'Old Inverness' was published, Queen Mary's House was under threat of demolition. It was, in fact, pulled down in 1968 to make way for the offices of the Highlands and Islands Development Board, although the cellars were retained.

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Queen Mary's House, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

drawings; visual art; houses; town houses

Highland Libraries

Old Inverness by Pierre Delavault (1903)

This drawing of Queen Mary's House in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).<br /> <br /> The description which accompanies this image explains that Queen Mary's House stood at the corner of Bridge Street, facing the River Ness. Between it and the river used to stand 'Castle Tolmie' which was pulled down when the suspension bridge was built in 1852.<br /> <br /> Queen Mary's house owes its name to the tradition that Mary, Queen of Scots, lodged there during a visit in 1562. In 1787, alterations and repairs were carried out by the owner, William Inglis of Kingsmills. At that time, the building was occupied by Messrs Fraser, Wilson & Co, Wine Merchants. The business was bought over by a succession of different wine merchants, as the thickness of the old walls produced an evenness of temperature very favourable to the storage of wine. <br /> <br /> In 1967, when 'Old Inverness' was published, Queen Mary's House was under threat of demolition. It was, in fact, pulled down in 1968 to make way for the offices of the Highlands and Islands Development Board, although the cellars were retained.