Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Abertarff House, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_273369_035
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1901
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Pierre Delavault
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31778
KEYWORDS
drawings
visual art
houses
Abertarff House, Inverness

This drawing of Abertarff House in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (1903).

According to the account on the previous page of the book , Abertarff House has been misnamed, partly because of its situation in Abertarff's Close, and partly because it once belonged to Colonel Archibald Fraser of Lovat, who also owned the Abertarff estates. With a turnpike staircase, it is the sole surviving example in Inverness of a style of house which was common throughout Scotland in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.

Sometime after 1801, Archibald Fraser of Lovat bought the building from Mr Suter, the father of the author of 'Memorabilia of Inverness', who himself had bought it from Mr Warrand of Warrandfield. It is believed that 'Old Archie', who had a great dread of a French invasion, bought the house, which had a flight of steps leading to the river, so that he could make his escape by boat to Beauly if the French landed.

The house later became the property of the Commercial Bank, which, as the National Commercial Bank of Scotland, made it over to the National Trust in 1963. Since then it has been restored and was let for a time to An Comunn Gaidhealach as its northern headquarters.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Abertarff House, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

drawings; visual art; houses

Highland Libraries

Old Inverness by Pierre Delavault (1903)

This drawing of Abertarff House in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (1903).<br /> <br /> According to the account on the previous page of the book , Abertarff House has been misnamed, partly because of its situation in Abertarff's Close, and partly because it once belonged to Colonel Archibald Fraser of Lovat, who also owned the Abertarff estates. With a turnpike staircase, it is the sole surviving example in Inverness of a style of house which was common throughout Scotland in the late 17th and early 18th centuries.<br /> <br /> Sometime after 1801, Archibald Fraser of Lovat bought the building from Mr Suter, the father of the author of 'Memorabilia of Inverness', who himself had bought it from Mr Warrand of Warrandfield. It is believed that 'Old Archie', who had a great dread of a French invasion, bought the house, which had a flight of steps leading to the river, so that he could make his escape by boat to Beauly if the French landed. <br /> <br /> The house later became the property of the Commercial Bank, which, as the National Commercial Bank of Scotland, made it over to the National Trust in 1963. Since then it has been restored and was let for a time to An Comunn Gaidhealach as its northern headquarters.