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TITLE
Greyfriars' Churchyard, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_273369_044
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
CREATOR
Pierre Delavault
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31781
KEYWORDS
drawings
visual art
graveyards
burial grounds
churchyards
Greyfriars' Churchyard, Inverness

This drawing of Greyfriars' Churchyard in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).

The description which accompanies this image observes that Greyfriars' Churchyard is probably the oldest burial ground in Inverness, having had connections with a monastery built in the early 13th century. Although known as 'Greyfriars', the charter given by King Alexander II shows that the monastery really belonged to the Dominicans, or Black Friars. The monastic buildings have long since disappeared, although some hold that a pillar standing in the churchyard is a remnant of the old monastery. Among the monuments in the churchyard is the effigy of a mailed warrior, which may originally have lain above the stone tomb of the Earl of Mar, who was Justiciar of Inverness in 1437, the year of his death.

Whether or not the name 'Greyfriars' is a misnomer, it is suggested that it has been hallowed by use and wont for over 300 years. It appears to have been used in an Act of the Town Council in 1653, when stones from the ruined 'Greyfriars Kirk' were being sold to build Cromwell's Fort. The name was also used on old maps.

The text also refers to three other burial grounds in Inverness: the High church yard, the Chapel yard and Tomnahurich. Tomnahurich, the hill at the south-west entrance to the town, was first used as a cemetery in 1860. According to this author, the most popular translation of its Gaelic name is 'Hill of the Fairies' but 'boat-shaped' and 'yew-covered' are also given.

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Greyfriars' Churchyard, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

drawings; visual art; graveyards; burial grounds; churchyards

Highland Libraries

Old Inverness by Pierre Delavault (1903)

This drawing of Greyfriars' Churchyard in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).<br /> <br /> The description which accompanies this image observes that Greyfriars' Churchyard is probably the oldest burial ground in Inverness, having had connections with a monastery built in the early 13th century. Although known as 'Greyfriars', the charter given by King Alexander II shows that the monastery really belonged to the Dominicans, or Black Friars. The monastic buildings have long since disappeared, although some hold that a pillar standing in the churchyard is a remnant of the old monastery. Among the monuments in the churchyard is the effigy of a mailed warrior, which may originally have lain above the stone tomb of the Earl of Mar, who was Justiciar of Inverness in 1437, the year of his death.<br /> <br /> Whether or not the name 'Greyfriars' is a misnomer, it is suggested that it has been hallowed by use and wont for over 300 years. It appears to have been used in an Act of the Town Council in 1653, when stones from the ruined 'Greyfriars Kirk' were being sold to build Cromwell's Fort. The name was also used on old maps. <br /> <br /> The text also refers to three other burial grounds in Inverness: the High church yard, the Chapel yard and Tomnahurich. Tomnahurich, the hill at the south-west entrance to the town, was first used as a cemetery in 1860. According to this author, the most popular translation of its Gaelic name is 'Hill of the Fairies' but 'boat-shaped' and 'yew-covered' are also given.