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TITLE
Inshes Family Burying Place, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_273369_050
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
DATE OF IMAGE
1901
PERIOD
1900s
CREATOR
Pierre Delavault
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31783
KEYWORDS
drawings
visual art
graveyards
burial grounds
churchyards
Inshes Family Burying Place, Inverness

This drawing of the Robertson of Inshes burial plot in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).

The description which accompanies this image notes that 'the curious old burial place' of the Inshes family is situated near the churchyard gate of the Old High Church. It was erected in 1663 by Janet Sinclair, the mother of William Robertson, of Inshes.

Janet Sinclair was the original owner of the 'Black Pulpit', a construction of Dutch origin which used to stand in the Gaelic church, later to become Greyfriars Free Church. In 1676, the pulpit was gifted to the Kirk Session of Inverness by William Robertson, in return for two pews in the church.

Within the Inshes burial place is a monumental stone to Hugo Robertson bearing the date '1703'.

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Inshes Family Burying Place, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

drawings; visual art; graveyards; burial grounds; churchyards

Highland Libraries

Old Inverness by Pierre Delavault (1903)

This drawing of the Robertson of Inshes burial plot in Inverness is taken from 'Old Inverness' by Pierre Delavault (published in 1903).<br /> <br /> The description which accompanies this image notes that 'the curious old burial place' of the Inshes family is situated near the churchyard gate of the Old High Church. It was erected in 1663 by Janet Sinclair, the mother of William Robertson, of Inshes. <br /> <br /> Janet Sinclair was the original owner of the 'Black Pulpit', a construction of Dutch origin which used to stand in the Gaelic church, later to become Greyfriars Free Church. In 1676, the pulpit was gifted to the Kirk Session of Inverness by William Robertson, in return for two pews in the church. <br /> <br /> Within the Inshes burial place is a monumental stone to Hugo Robertson bearing the date '1703'.