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TITLE
Model of Old Fort Augustus
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0025
PLACENAME
Fort Augustus
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31908
KEYWORDS
postcards
Jacobites
forts
monasterys
abbeys
Model of Old Fort Augustus

This postcard from the 1920s shows a model of Old Fort Augustus.

The fort at Fort Augustus was built by the Hanovarian Government after the Jacobite rising of 1715. A barrack was built in 1716 at the village of Kilchuimen at the head of Loch Ness and then in 1729 General Wade began building the fort, on a peninsula just outside the village, which he named after William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, youngest son of George II. When it was completed it could accommodate 300 men.

The Jacobite forces were defeated at Culloden in 1746 by the Duke of Cumberland and Simon, Lord Lovat, whose lands surrounded the Fort and who had supported the Stuart cause, was held in a dungeon at Fort Augustus before being taken to London for execution.

The garrison was withdrawn at the outbreak of the Crimean War and the fort was finally sold in 1867 to Thomas Alexander, 14th Lord Lovat of the reinstated Fraser family. His son, the 15th Lord Lovat, leased the buildings to the Monastic Order of Benedictines who converted the buildings into a monastery, abbey and school

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Model of Old Fort Augustus

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

1920s

postcards; Jacobites; forts; monasterys; abbeys

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard from the 1920s shows a model of Old Fort Augustus.<br /> <br /> The fort at Fort Augustus was built by the Hanovarian Government after the Jacobite rising of 1715. A barrack was built in 1716 at the village of Kilchuimen at the head of Loch Ness and then in 1729 General Wade began building the fort, on a peninsula just outside the village, which he named after William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, youngest son of George II. When it was completed it could accommodate 300 men.<br /> <br /> The Jacobite forces were defeated at Culloden in 1746 by the Duke of Cumberland and Simon, Lord Lovat, whose lands surrounded the Fort and who had supported the Stuart cause, was held in a dungeon at Fort Augustus before being taken to London for execution.<br /> <br /> The garrison was withdrawn at the outbreak of the Crimean War and the fort was finally sold in 1867 to Thomas Alexander, 14th Lord Lovat of the reinstated Fraser family. His son, the 15th Lord Lovat, leased the buildings to the Monastic Order of Benedictines who converted the buildings into a monastery, abbey and school