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TITLE
West End Hotel, Fort William
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0028
PLACENAME
Fort William
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmallie
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31911
KEYWORDS
postcards
hotels
forts
lochs
West End Hotel, Fort William

This postcard from the middle of the 20th century shows the West End Hotel, Fort William. Altered and extended since then it has a fine position overlooking Loch Linnhie.

Fort William is a town on Loch Linnhe on the west coast at the southern end of the Caledonian Canal in the shadow of Ben Nevis.

A town in Lochaber was first mooted by the Parliament of Scotland in 1597 but it wasn't until the time of Cromwell's Commonwealth that General Monk built a fortress here in 1654-55. Originally called Inverlochy 2000 troops were garrisoned here along with a number of workmen, servants, wives and children who settled in a village near to the fort. There numbers were gradually increased, according to the Memoirs of Sir Ewen Cameron of Locheill, "by the accession of others in desperat circumstances, whom the hopes of gain, and the security of living safe from the prosecutions of their defrauded creditors, allured from all parts of the kingdom" and from among such "needy desparadoes" the Governor had no difficulty recruiting spies.

After the Restoration General Mackay built a second fort which he called Fort William, after the King. The village which originally was called Gordonsburgh, having being built on land belonging to the Gordons was renamed Maryburgh, after the King's consort. Destroyed during the 1745 to make defending the Fort easier it was then rebuilt. When the Gordon estates were sold to Sir Duncan Cameron he attempted to change the name to Ducansburgh without success. Local people have always called it simply "An Gearasdan" meaning The Fort and so it became known as Fort William.

In 1884 the War Office finally sold the Fort to Alexander Campbell of Monzie. In 1889 his wife was compelled by Act of Parliament to sell the Fort to make way for the planned West Highland Railway.

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West End Hotel, Fort William

INVERNESS: Kilmallie

1950s

postcards; hotels; forts; lochs

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard from the middle of the 20th century shows the West End Hotel, Fort William. Altered and extended since then it has a fine position overlooking Loch Linnhie.<br /> <br /> Fort William is a town on Loch Linnhe on the west coast at the southern end of the Caledonian Canal in the shadow of Ben Nevis.<br /> <br /> A town in Lochaber was first mooted by the Parliament of Scotland in 1597 but it wasn't until the time of Cromwell's Commonwealth that General Monk built a fortress here in 1654-55. Originally called Inverlochy 2000 troops were garrisoned here along with a number of workmen, servants, wives and children who settled in a village near to the fort. There numbers were gradually increased, according to the Memoirs of Sir Ewen Cameron of Locheill, "by the accession of others in desperat circumstances, whom the hopes of gain, and the security of living safe from the prosecutions of their defrauded creditors, allured from all parts of the kingdom" and from among such "needy desparadoes" the Governor had no difficulty recruiting spies.<br /> <br /> After the Restoration General Mackay built a second fort which he called Fort William, after the King. The village which originally was called Gordonsburgh, having being built on land belonging to the Gordons was renamed Maryburgh, after the King's consort. Destroyed during the 1745 to make defending the Fort easier it was then rebuilt. When the Gordon estates were sold to Sir Duncan Cameron he attempted to change the name to Ducansburgh without success. Local people have always called it simply "An Gearasdan" meaning The Fort and so it became known as Fort William.<br /> <br /> In 1884 the War Office finally sold the Fort to Alexander Campbell of Monzie. In 1889 his wife was compelled by Act of Parliament to sell the Fort to make way for the planned West Highland Railway.