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TITLE
Loch Coruisk and the Cuillin Hills
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0100
PLACENAME
Loch Coruisk
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
31989
KEYWORDS
climbers
climber
mountaineers
mountaineer
mountains
mountain
lochs
postcards
Loch Coruisk and the Cuillin Hills

This postcard shows Loch Coruisk and the Cuillin Hills. A view of the lochs and mountains which have inspired many travellers and artists, notably J.M.W. Turner.

Loch Coruisk is an extremely deep rock-basin lake whose base is around 38 meters below sea level. It is surrounded by the Black Cuillin and can only be accessed by boat or by foot.

The Cuillin Hills are among the steepest mountains in the United Kingdom and are the highest range in the Hebrides. They include 15 peaks above 3000 feet and are formed from two main ridges- the Black Cuillin and the Red Cuillin. Records show that the first climber to ascend the Cuillin was the Reverend C. Lesingham Smith, in 1835

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Loch Coruisk and the Cuillin Hills

INVERNESS: Strath

1930s

climbers; climber; mountaineers; mountaineer; mountains; mountain; lochs; postcards

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Loch Coruisk and the Cuillin Hills. A view of the lochs and mountains which have inspired many travellers and artists, notably J.M.W. Turner.<br /> <br /> Loch Coruisk is an extremely deep rock-basin lake whose base is around 38 meters below sea level. It is surrounded by the Black Cuillin and can only be accessed by boat or by foot.<br /> <br /> The Cuillin Hills are among the steepest mountains in the United Kingdom and are the highest range in the Hebrides. They include 15 peaks above 3000 feet and are formed from two main ridges- the Black Cuillin and the Red Cuillin. Records show that the first climber to ascend the Cuillin was the Reverend C. Lesingham Smith, in 1835