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View of Inverness from Friars Shott

This postcard shows a view of Inverness from Friars Shott.

To the left is the Old High Church. It has stood on St. Michael's Mount since before 1171. Of the medieval church, the West Bell Tower is believed to be the oldest part, dating from the 15th or 16th century. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8 pm almost every evening since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II.

To the right of the Old High Church is the Free North Church, erected during the years 1889-1893 at the end of the Greig Street bridge. It was designed by Ross and MacBeth and built in the Decorated Gothic Style. Its steeple is the highest in Inverness with a lucarned spire at the top. On the right of the gabled front can be found a stair tower. The Free North Church can accommodate a congregation of 1300 people.

To the right again is the Free High Church, now St. Columba's. Situated on the site of an old brewery, it was built between 1851 and 1852 to a Perpendicular Gothic design by MacKenzie and Mathews. It was badly damaged by fire in 1939 but was restored between 1948 and 1953. The final spire is that of Inverness Town Steeple, built in 1791, and on the far right is Inverness Castle. The present sandstone buildings were erected in 1833-36 to a plan by William Burn of Edinburgh but the site has been occupied by various fortified structures since as far back as the 1100s. Today the castle serves as an administrative centre and courthouse

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View of Inverness from Friars Shott

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

churches; Old High Church; St. Michael's Mount; Free High Church; St. Columbas; postcards; towers; spires; parapets; belfries; steeples; clocks; bells; river; Ness; town; towns; Free North Church; castles; court house; court houses; courthouses

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Inverness from Friars Shott. <br /> <br /> To the left is the Old High Church. It has stood on St. Michael's Mount since before 1171. Of the medieval church, the West Bell Tower is believed to be the oldest part, dating from the 15th or 16th century. The top of the tower dates from the 17th century and replaces the medieval spire and roof. It has a corbelled parapet and a copper-covered spire. The stone corbel-stones for the original timbers are still in existence inside the belfry. The tower has a clock with four faces, and the bell has been rung at 8 pm almost every evening since 1720. The only time when this was not the case was during World War II.<br /> <br /> To the right of the Old High Church is the Free North Church, erected during the years 1889-1893 at the end of the Greig Street bridge. It was designed by Ross and MacBeth and built in the Decorated Gothic Style. Its steeple is the highest in Inverness with a lucarned spire at the top. On the right of the gabled front can be found a stair tower. The Free North Church can accommodate a congregation of 1300 people.<br /> <br /> To the right again is the Free High Church, now St. Columba's. Situated on the site of an old brewery, it was built between 1851 and 1852 to a Perpendicular Gothic design by MacKenzie and Mathews. It was badly damaged by fire in 1939 but was restored between 1948 and 1953. The final spire is that of Inverness Town Steeple, built in 1791, and on the far right is Inverness Castle. The present sandstone buildings were erected in 1833-36 to a plan by William Burn of Edinburgh but the site has been occupied by various fortified structures since as far back as the 1100s. Today the castle serves as an administrative centre and courthouse