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TITLE
Glenelg by the shores of Glenelg Bay
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0130
PLACENAME
Glenelg
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Glenelg
PERIOD
1920s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32022
KEYWORDS
Kirkton
Bernera Barracks
brochs
broch
Skye
postcards
Glenelg by the shores of Glenelg Bay

This postcard shows a view of Glenelg village, by the shores of Glenelg Bay.

Glenelg is a small village, looking across to the Isle of Skye. It is bound on three sides by sea - Loch Duich, the Sound of Sleat and Loch Hourn - and has only one access road over Mam Ratagan from Glen Shiel. Known until the 18th century as Kirkton, the village grew up round a parish church, and expanded with the arrival of the army and the building of the Bernera Barracks in 1717. The village is well-known as the location of two well-preserved Iron Age brochs, and was once the main crossing point for cattle droves from Skye to the mainland. A small ferry still plies the route during the summer months

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Glenelg by the shores of Glenelg Bay

INVERNESS: Glenelg

1920s

Kirkton; Bernera Barracks; brochs; broch; Skye; postcards

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Glenelg village, by the shores of Glenelg Bay.<br /> <br /> Glenelg is a small village, looking across to the Isle of Skye. It is bound on three sides by sea - Loch Duich, the Sound of Sleat and Loch Hourn - and has only one access road over Mam Ratagan from Glen Shiel. Known until the 18th century as Kirkton, the village grew up round a parish church, and expanded with the arrival of the army and the building of the Bernera Barracks in 1717. The village is well-known as the location of two well-preserved Iron Age brochs, and was once the main crossing point for cattle droves from Skye to the mainland. A small ferry still plies the route during the summer months