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TITLE
Interior of Inverness-shire cottage, Highland Folk Museum, Kingussie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0134
PLACENAME
Highland Folk Museum
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh
PERIOD
1930s
CREATOR
J Valentine & Co.
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32027
KEYWORDS
bellows
tongs
cooking pots
creepies
chairs
postcards
croft house
croft houses
crofthouse
crofthouses
Interior of Inverness-shire cottage, Highland Folk Museum, Kingussie

This postcard shows an example of the interior of an Inverness-shire cottage, exhibited at the Highland Folk Museum in Kingussie. Various tools and utensils are visible throughout the room, including bellows and tongs by the fireside, an iron to the right of the fireplace and cast-iron cooking pots beneath the wooden dresser.

Low wooden chairs can also be seen in the room, sometimes referred to as creepies. Traditional croft houses had no chimney so it would be very smoky inside. The least smoky place was close to the floor, so chairs were made with short legs

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Interior of Inverness-shire cottage, Highland Folk Museum, Kingussie

INVERNESS: Kingussie and Insh

1930s

bellows; tongs; cooking pots; creepies; chairs; postcards; croft house; croft houses; crofthouse; crofthouses

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows an example of the interior of an Inverness-shire cottage, exhibited at the Highland Folk Museum in Kingussie. Various tools and utensils are visible throughout the room, including bellows and tongs by the fireside, an iron to the right of the fireplace and cast-iron cooking pots beneath the wooden dresser.<br /> <br /> Low wooden chairs can also be seen in the room, sometimes referred to as creepies. Traditional croft houses had no chimney so it would be very smoky inside. The least smoky place was close to the floor, so chairs were made with short legs