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TITLE
Catherine Morrison, Portnalong, weaving, 1933
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0136
PLACENAME
Portnalong
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Bracadale
DATE OF IMAGE
1933
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32029
KEYWORDS
Harris Tweed
weaving
Department of Agriculture
Lewis
Harris
Scalpay
crofting
fishing
postcards
tweeds
exports
Catherine Morrison, Portnalong, weaving, 1933

This postcard shows Harris tweed being woven at Portnalong on the Isle of Skye. Portnalong is situated by the shores of Loch Harport. During the 1920s, the Department of Agriculture resettled families here from the overcrowded islands of Lewis, Harris and Scalpay. Corrugated iron huts were built on the island to offer shelter for the families, until they were able to build their own houses. Some of the huts are still in existence today.

Every family was given between 15 and 20 acres of land, three cows and a share in several thousand acres of sheep grazings. Families were expected to support themselves through crofting, fishing and weaving. Every year until 1939, a gathering was held at Portnalong where woven goods would be sold. After World War II, weaving tweed once again became popular and many of the goods were exported to America

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Catherine Morrison, Portnalong, weaving, 1933

INVERNESS: Bracadale

1930s

Harris Tweed; weaving; Department of Agriculture; Lewis; Harris; Scalpay; crofting; fishing; postcards; tweeds; exports

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Harris tweed being woven at Portnalong on the Isle of Skye. Portnalong is situated by the shores of Loch Harport. During the 1920s, the Department of Agriculture resettled families here from the overcrowded islands of Lewis, Harris and Scalpay. Corrugated iron huts were built on the island to offer shelter for the families, until they were able to build their own houses. Some of the huts are still in existence today. <br /> <br /> Every family was given between 15 and 20 acres of land, three cows and a share in several thousand acres of sheep grazings. Families were expected to support themselves through crofting, fishing and weaving. Every year until 1939, a gathering was held at Portnalong where woven goods would be sold. After World War II, weaving tweed once again became popular and many of the goods were exported to America