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TITLE
Loch Eriboll and Ard Neakie, Durness
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0140
PLACENAME
Durness
DISTRICT
Eddrachillis and Durness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Durness
PERIOD
1910s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32034
KEYWORDS
lochs
quarries
limestone
quarrying
u-boats
postcards
Loch Eriboll and Ard Neakie, Durness

This postcard shows Loch Eriboll and Ard Neakie, Durness. To the left, on the east side, is a limestone quarry and lime kilns. The west side is formed from quartzite

Loch Eriboll is the deepest sea loch in the United Kingdom, and was formerly an important naval anchorage. In May 1945 it was a rendezvous point for surrendering German U-boats, when more than thirty submarines came into the Loch.

Ard Neakie is connected to the mainland only by a strip of sand linking it to the east shore of Loch Eriboll. It was once the site of a limestone quarry and four lime kilns, built in 1840. The Reay estate produced large amounts of lime here, and transported it onto nearby ships. It was used as a neutralising agent when reclaiming peaty soils for cultivation

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Loch Eriboll and Ard Neakie, Durness

SUTHERLAND: Durness

1910s

lochs; quarries; limestone; quarrying; u-boats; postcards

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows Loch Eriboll and Ard Neakie, Durness. To the left, on the east side, is a limestone quarry and lime kilns. The west side is formed from quartzite<br /> <br /> Loch Eriboll is the deepest sea loch in the United Kingdom, and was formerly an important naval anchorage. In May 1945 it was a rendezvous point for surrendering German U-boats, when more than thirty submarines came into the Loch. <br /> <br /> Ard Neakie is connected to the mainland only by a strip of sand linking it to the east shore of Loch Eriboll. It was once the site of a limestone quarry and four lime kilns, built in 1840. The Reay estate produced large amounts of lime here, and transported it onto nearby ships. It was used as a neutralising agent when reclaiming peaty soils for cultivation