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Secret portrait of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, Fort William

This postcard shows a secret portrait of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, held at the West Highland museum in Fort William. It was used to secretly toast the exiled prince. The portrait works by optical illusion. The tray is composed of an abstract design but when a cylinder is placed on it at the correct angle, a portrait is reflected .

During the aftermath of the Battle of Culloden, authorities banned anything connected to Jacobitism, in order to avoid any further uprisings. Clans were banned from carrying arms, wearing tartan and showing allegiance to the exiled prince. It was also illegal for anyone to display portraits of Prince Charles Edward Stuart in their homes. Jacobite artists went to extreme lengths to show allegiance to the House of Stewart, learning to paint secret portraits

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Secret portrait of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, Fort William

INVERNESS: Kilmallie

1950s

portraits; secret portraits; West Highland museum; Prince Charles Edward Stuart; Bonnie Prince Charlie; Battle of Culloden; Jacobites; Jacobitism; House of Stewart; Jacobite; postcards

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a secret portrait of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, held at the West Highland museum in Fort William. It was used to secretly toast the exiled prince. The portrait works by optical illusion. The tray is composed of an abstract design but when a cylinder is placed on it at the correct angle, a portrait is reflected .<br /> <br /> During the aftermath of the Battle of Culloden, authorities banned anything connected to Jacobitism, in order to avoid any further uprisings. Clans were banned from carrying arms, wearing tartan and showing allegiance to the exiled prince. It was also illegal for anyone to display portraits of Prince Charles Edward Stuart in their homes. Jacobite artists went to extreme lengths to show allegiance to the House of Stewart, learning to paint secret portraits