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TITLE
Interview with Elsie Cormack about war-time food
EXTERNAL ID
WD_HF03_TRACK03_CORMACK
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Wick
DATE OF RECORDING
2005
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Elsie Cormack
SOURCE
Am Baile and War Detectives
ASSET ID
3204
KEYWORDS
World War 2
World War II
Second World War
2nd World War
rationing
rations
barter
audio

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Elsie Cormack thinks they weren't too badly off for food in Caithness during World War 2.

You know, you got something like a shilling's worth of beef, but ye see, ye canna think what a shilling's worth of beef now, you know. But we weren't hard done by as far as rationing goes, in it, up here in the north, in Thurso or Wick, because we'd got the sea, so we could always get fish. You know, if it was there, we could get fish. Maybe you got fish more times than you wanted but it was good for, gave you brains. Then we had farms around us, so you could get eggs, you could get vegetables - you know, turnip an' tatties an' a' the rest of it, you know, so we weren't the hard ones during the war. It was the ones that were in the city were, that were strictly, you know, you could always go till the butcher's. As one person said in Thurso here too not so long ago, he said, folk didn't have a lot o' money; money was - They bartered more than they worked wi' money really. But I mean, you could go along till the butcher's an' you could get half a pound o' sausages, for example, and a bone. You see, an' that days was before this BSE an' things an' you were allowed till get a bone. Well, your mother could make a lovely drop o' soup if she got a, what they called, a nap bone - would make a lovely drop o' soup. An' then you got a sausage after it or something. Well, that was you fed. An' you got tatties an' all that sort of things.

This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.

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Interview with Elsie Cormack about war-time food

CAITHNESS: Wick

2000s

World War 2; World War II; Second World War; 2nd World War; rationing; rations; barter; audio

Am Baile and War Detectives

War Detectives (interviews)

Elsie Cormack thinks they weren't too badly off for food in Caithness during World War 2.<br /> <br /> You know, you got something like a shilling's worth of beef, but ye see, ye canna think what a shilling's worth of beef now, you know. But we weren't hard done by as far as rationing goes, in it, up here in the north, in Thurso or Wick, because we'd got the sea, so we could always get fish. You know, if it was there, we could get fish. Maybe you got fish more times than you wanted but it was good for, gave you brains. Then we had farms around us, so you could get eggs, you could get vegetables - you know, turnip an' tatties an' a' the rest of it, you know, so we weren't the hard ones during the war. It was the ones that were in the city were, that were strictly, you know, you could always go till the butcher's. As one person said in Thurso here too not so long ago, he said, folk didn't have a lot o' money; money was - They bartered more than they worked wi' money really. But I mean, you could go along till the butcher's an' you could get half a pound o' sausages, for example, and a bone. You see, an' that days was before this BSE an' things an' you were allowed till get a bone. Well, your mother could make a lovely drop o' soup if she got a, what they called, a nap bone - would make a lovely drop o' soup. An' then you got a sausage after it or something. Well, that was you fed. An' you got tatties an' all that sort of things. <br /> <br /> This interview was recorded as part of a War Detectives project in 2005 at Pennyland Primary School, Thurso.