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TITLE
The pier at John O'Groats
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0202
PLACENAME
John o' Groats
DISTRICT
Caithness - Northern
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Canisbay
PERIOD
1890s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32100
KEYWORDS
piers
lobster
crab
fishing
Jan de Groot
ferries
postcards
lobsters
crabs
The pier at John O'Groats

This postcard shows fishermen at John O' Groats pier. The small harbour is regularly used by fishermen, to catch lobster and crab. A ferry also runs from John O' Groats, carrying foot passengers across to Orkney between May and September.

John O' Groats is the most northerly village on the British mainland. It is named after Jan de Groot, a Dutchman who arrived in the area in the late 1400s. In 1486, De Groot was given the first license to operate a ferry between John O' Groats and Orkney.

Local folklore suggests that the Dutchman built an octagonal house at John O' Groats with an eight-sided table inside, so he could eat with his eight sons. This prevented arguments over who was closest to the head of the table and meant that all sons could find favour with their father. The John O' Groats Hotel is situated where the house was thought to have been. A flagpole by the side of the hotel marks the spot and the building's octagonal shape is reflected in the architecture of the hotel

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The pier at John O'Groats

CAITHNESS: Canisbay

1890s

piers; lobster; crab; fishing; Jan de Groot; ferries; postcards; lobsters; crabs

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows fishermen at John O' Groats pier. The small harbour is regularly used by fishermen, to catch lobster and crab. A ferry also runs from John O' Groats, carrying foot passengers across to Orkney between May and September. <br /> <br /> John O' Groats is the most northerly village on the British mainland. It is named after Jan de Groot, a Dutchman who arrived in the area in the late 1400s. In 1486, De Groot was given the first license to operate a ferry between John O' Groats and Orkney. <br /> <br /> Local folklore suggests that the Dutchman built an octagonal house at John O' Groats with an eight-sided table inside, so he could eat with his eight sons. This prevented arguments over who was closest to the head of the table and meant that all sons could find favour with their father. The John O' Groats Hotel is situated where the house was thought to have been. A flagpole by the side of the hotel marks the spot and the building's octagonal shape is reflected in the architecture of the hotel