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TITLE
Inverness Castle and Ness Bridge
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0224
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1900s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32123
KEYWORDS
castles
bridges
Ness Bridge
postcards
rivers
Inverness Castle and Ness Bridge

This postcard shows a view of Inverness Castle and the Ness Bridge.

The present castle was erected in 1833-36 to a plan by William Burn of Edinburgh but the site has been occupied by various fortified structures since as far back as the 1100s. Today the castle serves as an administrative centre and courthouse.

The Ness Bridge traversed the River Ness. Opened in August 1855, it was a suspension bridge spanning 68.5 metres and replaced the previous structure, which had been washed away in the floods of 1849. When it was later unable to cope with the volume of traffic, a contract was tendered for a replacement in 1939, though work was not to begin for a further 20 years

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Inverness Castle and Ness Bridge

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1900s

castles; bridges; Ness Bridge; postcards; rivers

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Inverness Castle and the Ness Bridge.<br /> <br /> The present castle was erected in 1833-36 to a plan by William Burn of Edinburgh but the site has been occupied by various fortified structures since as far back as the 1100s. Today the castle serves as an administrative centre and courthouse.<br /> <br /> The Ness Bridge traversed the River Ness. Opened in August 1855, it was a suspension bridge spanning 68.5 metres and replaced the previous structure, which had been washed away in the floods of 1849. When it was later unable to cope with the volume of traffic, a contract was tendered for a replacement in 1939, though work was not to begin for a further 20 years