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TITLE
Canal locks at Fort Augustus
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0253_AT
PLACENAME
Fort Augustus
DISTRICT
Aird
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff
DATE OF IMAGE
2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Andrew Taylor
SOURCE
Andrew Taylor
ASSET ID
32154
KEYWORDS
canals
Caledonian Canal
canal locks
Thomas Telford
capstans
vessels
ships
boats
engineers
waterways
Canal locks at Fort Augustus

This photograph shows the canal locks at Fort Augustus. One of a flight of five locks in the village, as the Caledonian Canal drops down to join Loch Ness.

The Caledonian Canal connects Corpach, near Fort William to Clachnaharry, Inverness and is approximately 60 miles long. It was built wide enough in places to accommodate Royal Navy gun frigates during the Napoleonic Wars. Ships were able to avoid the stormy Pentland Firth and the French fleet. Much of the canal's length is taken up with existing lochs - Loch Dochfour, Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy. There are 29 locks in the canal including 'Neptune's Staircase', a series of 8 locks at Banavie. Designs for the canal were prepared as early as 1773 by James Watt but work was not begun until 1803 by which time the designers were Jessop and Telford. Partially opened in 1822, the canal was finally completed in 1843-47.

The Caledonian Canal runs through the centre of Fort Augustus, originally named after St Cummein and in Gaelic the name is still Cille Chumein. The village's name changed during the 18th century when General Wade built a fort there, beside Loch Ness. The fort was named after one of George II's sons who was to become Duke of Cumberland, the famous 'Butcher' of Culloden

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Canal locks at Fort Augustus

INVERNESS: Boleskine and Abertarff

2000s

canals; Caledonian Canal; canal locks; Thomas Telford; capstans; vessels; ships; boats; engineers; waterways

Andrew Taylor

This photograph shows the canal locks at Fort Augustus. One of a flight of five locks in the village, as the Caledonian Canal drops down to join Loch Ness. <br /> <br /> The Caledonian Canal connects Corpach, near Fort William to Clachnaharry, Inverness and is approximately 60 miles long. It was built wide enough in places to accommodate Royal Navy gun frigates during the Napoleonic Wars. Ships were able to avoid the stormy Pentland Firth and the French fleet. Much of the canal's length is taken up with existing lochs - Loch Dochfour, Loch Ness, Loch Oich and Loch Lochy. There are 29 locks in the canal including 'Neptune's Staircase', a series of 8 locks at Banavie. Designs for the canal were prepared as early as 1773 by James Watt but work was not begun until 1803 by which time the designers were Jessop and Telford. Partially opened in 1822, the canal was finally completed in 1843-47.<br /> <br /> The Caledonian Canal runs through the centre of Fort Augustus, originally named after St Cummein and in Gaelic the name is still Cille Chumein. The village's name changed during the 18th century when General Wade built a fort there, beside Loch Ness. The fort was named after one of George II's sons who was to become Duke of Cumberland, the famous 'Butcher' of Culloden