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TITLE
Dunrobin Castle, Golspie
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CARD_0259
PLACENAME
Dunrobin Castle
DISTRICT
Golspie, Rogart and Lairg
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
SUTHERLAND: Golspie
PERIOD
1960s
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
32160
KEYWORDS
castles
Dukes of Sutherland
gentry
architects
postcards
Dunrobin Castle, Golspie

This postcard shows a view of Dunrobin Castle in Golspie, Sutherland.

Dunrobin has been the principal seat of the Dukes of Sutherland since the 12th century. The castle originally consisted of a keep (dating from 1401) and a large 17th-century house based around a central courtyard but very little of these earlier structures still survives. The impressive exterior (similar in style to a French chateau) dates mainly from the mid-19th century. The architects were Sir Charles Barry and William Leslie.

A fire in 1915 destroyed much of Barry's interior and the leading Scottish architect, Sir Robert Lorimer, was commissioned to redesign many rooms including the dining room, the drawing room and library. A museum was created in the former summer house in 1878. It contains many Pictish stones and game trophies

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Dunrobin Castle, Golspie

SUTHERLAND: Golspie

1960s

castles; Dukes of Sutherland; gentry; architects; postcards

Highland Libraries

Highland Libraries' Postcard Collection

This postcard shows a view of Dunrobin Castle in Golspie, Sutherland.<br /> <br /> Dunrobin has been the principal seat of the Dukes of Sutherland since the 12th century. The castle originally consisted of a keep (dating from 1401) and a large 17th-century house based around a central courtyard but very little of these earlier structures still survives. The impressive exterior (similar in style to a French chateau) dates mainly from the mid-19th century. The architects were Sir Charles Barry and William Leslie. <br /> <br /> A fire in 1915 destroyed much of Barry's interior and the leading Scottish architect, Sir Robert Lorimer, was commissioned to redesign many rooms including the dining room, the drawing room and library. A museum was created in the former summer house in 1878. It contains many Pictish stones and game trophies